Etymology
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said (adj.)

"named or mentioned before," c. 1300, past-participle adjective from say (v.). Expression all is said and done is from 1550s.

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aforesaid (adj.)
"mentioned before in a preceding part of the same writing or speech," a common legal word, late 14c., from afore + said.
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conker (n.)

"snail shell" (said to date from 1847), also "horse chestnut" (said to date from 1886), both said to be from children's game of conkers (q.v.).

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bong (n.2)
"water pipe for marijuana," 1960s, U.S. slang, said to have been introduced by Vietnam War veterans, said to be from Thai baung, literally "cylindrical wooden tube."
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deadline (n.)

"time limit," 1920, American English newspaper jargon, from dead (adj.) + line (n.). Perhaps influenced by earlier use (1864) to mean the "do-not-cross" line in Civil War prisons, which figured in the trial of Henry Wirz, commander of the notorious Confederate prison at Andersonville, Georgia.

And he, the said Wirz, still wickedly pursuing his evil purpose, did establish and cause to be designated within the prison enclosure containing said prisoners a "dead line," being a line around the inner face of the stockade or wall enclosing said prison and about twenty feet distant from and within said stockade; and so established said dead line, which was in many places an imaginary line, in many other places marked by insecure and shifting strips of [boards nailed] upon the tops of small and insecure stakes or posts, he, the said Wirz, instructed the prison guard stationed around the top of said stockade to fire upon and kill any of the prisoners aforesaid who might touch, fall upon, pass over or under [or] across the said "dead line" .... ["Trial of Henry Wirz," Report of the Secretary of War, Oct. 31, 1865]
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Rolodex (n.)
1958, said to be from rolling + index.
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Caesar salad (n.)
1952, said to be named not for the emperor, but for Cesar Cardini, restaurant owner in Tijuana, Mexico, who is said to have served the first one c. 1924.
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Guinevere 

fem. proper name, also Guiniver, Guinever, Gwiniver; the name is Welsh, said to be from Gwenhwyvar, said to mean literally "white-cheeked," but "Magic Fairy" also has been proposed.

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wigwam (n.)
1620s, from Algonquian (probably Eastern Abenaki) wikewam "a dwelling," said to mean literally "their house;" also said to be found in such formations as wikiwam and Ojibwa wiigiwaam and Delaware wiquoam.
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I Ching 
1876, from Chinese, said to mean "Book of Changes."
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