Advertisement
5451 entries found.
Search filter: All Results 
savoury 
chiefly British English spelling of savory; also see -or.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Savoy 
region in southeastern France (before 1800 part of the Kingdom of Sardinia), French Savoie, from Roman Sapaudia, of unknown origin. Related: Savoyard.
Related entries & more 
savvy (n.)
1785, "practical sense, intelligence;" also a verb, "to know, to understand;" West Indies pidgin borrowing of French savez(-vous)? "do you know?" or Spanish sabe (usted) "you know," both from Vulgar Latin *sapere, from Latin sapere "be wise, be knowing" (see sapient). The adjective is first recorded 1905, from the noun. Related: Savvily; savviness.
Related entries & more 
saw (v.)
"cut with a saw," c. 1200, sauen, saghen, from saw (n.1). Strong conjugation began by c. 1400 on model of draw, etc. Related: Sawed; sawing. Sawed-off "short, cut short" is attested 1887 of persons, 1898 of shotguns.
Related entries & more 
saw (v.)
past tense of see; from Old English plural sawon.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
saw (n.2)
"proverb, saying, maxim," Old English sagu "saying, discourse, speech, study, tradition, tale," from Proto-Germanic *saga-, *sagon- (source also of Middle Low German, Middle Dutch sage, zage, German Sage "legend, fable, saga, myth, tradition," Old Norse saga "story, tale, saga"), from PIE root *sek(w)- "to say, utter" (see say (v.)). "[A] contemptuous term for an expression that is more common than wise" [Century Dictionary].
Related entries & more 
saw (n.1)
toothed cutting tool, Old English sagu, from Proto-Germanic *sago "a cutting tool" (source also of Old English seax "knife," Old Norse sög, Norwegian sag, Danish sav, Swedish såg, Middle Dutch saghe, Dutch zaag, Old High German saga, German Säge "saw"), from PIE root *sek- "to cut" (source also of Latin secare "to cut").
Related entries & more 
sawbones (n.)
"surgeon," 1837, slang, from verbal phrase; see saw (v.) + bone (n.).
Related entries & more 
sawbuck (n.)
"ten-dollar bill," American English slang, 1850, from resemblance of X (Roman numeral 10) to the ends of a sawhorse. Sawbuck in the sense of "sawhorse" is attested only from 1862 but presumably is older (see saw (n.1)).
Related entries & more 

Page 48