Etymology
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sandwich (v.)

"insert between two other things," 1841, from sandwich (n.), on the image of meat pressed between identical pieces of bread. Related: Sandwiched; sandwiching.

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sandwich (n.)

1762, said to be a reference to John Montagu (1718-1792), 4th Earl of Sandwich, who was said to be an inveterate gambler who ate slices of cold meat between bread at the gaming table during marathon sessions rather than rising for a proper meal (this account of the origin dates to 1770).

It also was in his honor that Cook named the Hawaiian islands (1778) when Montagu was first lord of the Admiralty (hence the occasional 19c. British Sandwicher for "a Hawaiian"). The family name is from the place in Kent, one of the Cinque Ports, Old English Sandwicæ, literally "sandy harbor (or trading center)." For pronunciation, see cabbage. Sandwich board, one before and one behind the carrier, is from 1864.

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Sandy (n.)

late 15c. as a nickname for Alexander; it is a diminutive or familiar variant of the nickname Saunder, which is preserved in surnames, as in Clerk Saunders of the old Border ballad. As the typical name for a Scotsman (especially a Lowlander) from 1785; in that use also punning on the hair-color sense of sandy (adj.). Also Sawney.

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sandy (adj.)

Middle English sandie, "consisting mainly of sand, abounding in sand," from Old English sandig "of the nature of sand;" see sand (n.) + -y (2). Meaning "of yellowish-red hue" (in reference to hair) is from 1520s.

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sane (adj.)

"of sound mind, mentally sound," 1721, a back-formation from insane or sanity or else from Latin sanus "sound, healthy," in its figurative or transferred use, "of sound mind, rational, sane," also, of style, "correct;" a word of uncertain origin.

It is perhaps from PIE *seh-no- from *seh- "to tie." That reconstruction "is purely mechanical," according to de Vaan, the meaning might be "which is in place, in order." Or it could be from a different root meaning "to satisfy" as in Latin satis "enough."

Used earlier, of the body, with a sense of "healthy" (1620s), but this has been rare in English. OED writes, "The almost entire restriction in English to a sense 'mentally sound' is due to the use in antithesis with insane, which (like the Latin insanus, its source) always referred to mental condition." Related: Sanely; saneness.

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sang-froid (n.)

also sangfroid, "presence of mind, coolness, mental composure," 1712, from French sang froid, literally "cool blood," from sang "blood" (from Latin sanguis; see sanguinary) + froid "cold" (from Latin frigidus; see frigid). "In the 17th c. the expression was in France often written erroneously sens froid, as if it contained sens "sense" instead of the homophonous sang "blood'." [OED].

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sangha 

community of monks, 1858, from Hindi sangha, Sanskrit samgha, from sam "together" (from PIE root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with") + han "to come in contact."

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sangrail (n.)
"the Holy Grail," mid-15c., from Old French Saint Graal, literally "Holy Grail" (see saint (n.) + grail).
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sangria (n.)

cold drink made variously from sweetened and diluted red wine, 1954, from Spanish, literally "a bleeding," from sangre "blood," from Vulgar Latin *sanguem, from Latin sanguis (see sanguinary). The drink so named for its color. Earlier in English as sangre (1736), sangaree.

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