Etymology
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sampler (n.)

early 14c., "pattern or model to be imitated," from sample (n.) in one of its older senses now found only in its source, example. The meaning "embroidery specimen by a beginner to show skill," (1520s) is probably originally meant as "piece of embroidery serving as an illustrative specimen," or "pattern to be copied or to fix and retain a valuable pattern." As "a collection of samples, a representative selection," from 1912.

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samsara (n.)

"endless cycle of death and rebirth, transmigration of souls," 1886, from Sanskrit samsara "a wandering through," from sam-, prefix denoting completeness (from PIE root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with"), + sr- "to run, glide" (from PIE verbal stem *ser- "to flow;" see serum).

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Samson 

masc. proper name, Jewish strong-man (Judges xiii-xvi), from Late Latin Samson, Sampson, from Greek Sampsōn, from Hebrew Shimshon, probably from shemesh "sun." As a generic name for a man of great strength, attested from 1565. Samsonite, proprietary name for a make of luggage (with -ite (1)), is 1939, by Shwayder Bros. Inc., Denver, Colorado. Earlier it was a type of dynamite (1909).

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Samuel 
masc. proper name, Biblical judge and prophet, from Late Latin, from Greek Samouel, from Hebrew Shemiel, literally "the name of God," from shem "name" + El "God."
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samurai (n.)

one of the military class in Japanese feudalism, originally a military retainer of a daimio, 1727, from Japanese samurai "warrior, knight," variant of saburai, nominal form of sabura(h)u "to be in attendance, to serve."

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san 

Japanese honorific title suffixed to personal or family names, 1878, short form of more formal sama.

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San Francisco 
city in California, U.S., named in Spanish for St. Francis of Assisi; the name first recorded in reference to this region 1590s, reinforced by long association of the area with the Franciscan order.
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sanatorium (n.)

by 1839 as "hospital, usually private, for the treatment of invalids, convalescents, etc., who might benefit from open air;" by 1842 as "place to which people go for the sake of health or to regain health;" Modern Latin, noun use of neuter of Late Latin adjective sanitorius "health-giving," from Latin sanat-, past-participle stem of sanare "to heal," from sanus "well, healthy, sane" (see sane).

Latin sanare is the source of Italian sanare, Spanish sanar. Century Dictionary [1895] notes it was "specifically applied to military stations on the mountains or tablelands of tropical countries, with climates suited to the health of Europeans."

Many of his patients had asked him what this hard word sanatorium meant, and he explained to them, that it was a lodging-house, which was, in fact, the proper alias of sanatorium, and that it was to the benefit of Dr. Arnott's stove and of regularity in the time of giving medicine. [from report on a "Debate on the Sanatorium" in The Lancet, Jan. 11, 1840]
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sanctification (n.)

"act or fact of being made holy; state of being made holy," c. 1400, sanctificacioun, from Old French sanctificacion and directly from Church Latin sanctificationem, noun of action from past-participle stem of Late Latin sanctificare "to make holy," from sanctus "holy" (see saint (n.)). Old French also had it in the semi-popularized saintificacion, thus the occasional Middle English form seintificacionne.

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sanctify (v.)

late 14c., seintefien "to consecrate, set apart for sacred use;" c. 1400, "to render holy or legitimate by religious sanction;" from Old French saintefier "sanctify" (12c., Modern French sanctifier), from Late Latin sanctificare "to make holy," from sanctus "holy" (see saint (n.)) + combining form of facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

The form was altered in English c. 1400 to conform to Latin. From 1520s (Tyndale) as "to free from sin." The transferred sense of "to render worthy of respect" is from c. 1600. Related: Sanctified; sanctifying.

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