Etymology
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salubrious (adj.)

"favorable to health, wholesome," 1540s, from Latin salubris "promoting health, healthful," from salus (genitive salutis) "welfare, health" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept"). Originally of foods, medicine; in reference to air, climate, etc., by 1610s. Related: Salubriously; salubriousness.

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salubrity (n.)

"healthfulness, state or character of being healthful," early 15c., salubrite, Old French salubrite and directly from Latin salubritas, from salubris "promoting health, healthful" (see salubrious).

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salud (interj.)

toast before drinking, Spanish, literally "(good) health;" attested in English by 1931. French equivalent salut is attested in English by 1921.

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salutary (adj.)

"wholesome, healthful, healing," late 15c. (Caxton), from Old French salutaire "beneficial," or directly from Latin salutaris "healthful," from salus (genitive salutis) "good health" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept"). By 19c. also in a general sense, "contributing to some beneficial purpose." Earlier as a noun, salutari, "a remedy," (early 15c.), from Latin salutaris (n.).

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salutation (n.)

late 14c., salutacioun, "a courteous or respectful greeting; a ceremonial visit; a sign of respect," from Old French salutacion "greeting" and directly from Latin salutationem (nominative salutatio) "a greeting, saluting," noun of action from past-participle stem of salutare "to greet, pay respects," literally "wish health to" (see salute (v.)). As a word of greeting (elliptical for "I offer salutation") it is recorded from 1530s. Related: Salutations.

A greeting generally expresses a person's sense of pleasure or good wishes upon meeting another. Salutation and salute are by derivation a wishing of health, and are still modified by that idea. A salutation is personal, a salute official or formal ; salutation suggests the act of the person saluting, salute is the thing done ; a salutation is generally in words, a salute may be by cheers, the dipping of colors, the roll of drums, the firing of cannon, etc. [Century Dictionary]
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salutatorian (n.)

1841, "member of a college graduating class who pronounces the salutatory oration at the annual commencement exercises," American English; with -ian + salutatory "of the nature of a salutation," here in the specific sense "designating the welcoming address given at college commencement exercises" (1702). The address, usually in Latin, typically was given by the second-ranking graduating student.

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salutatory (adj.)

1690s, "pertaining to a salutation; of the nature of a greeting," from Latin salutatorius "pertaining to visiting or greeting," from salut-, past-participle stem of salutare "to greet" (see salute (v.)). From 1702 in reference to an address which welcomes those attending commencement exercises.

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salute (v.)

late 14c., saluten, "to greet courteously and respectfully," earlier salue (c. 1300, from Old French salver), from Latin salutare "to greet, pay respects," literally "wish health to," from salus (genitive salutis) "greeting, good health," which is related to salvus "safe" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept").

The military and nautical sense of "display flags, fire cannons, etc., as a mark of ceremonious recognition or respect" is recorded from 1580s; specific sense of "raise the hand to the cap in the presence of a superior officer" is from 1844. In 18c. use often "to greet with a kiss."

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salute (n.)

c. 1400, "act of saluting, respectful gesture of greeting, salutation," from salute (v.). The older form was salu (c. 1200), from Old French salu and directly from Latin salus. The military sense of "ceremonial compliment" is from 1690s; specifically of the hand-to-cap gesture by an inferior to a superior from 1832.

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salvage (n.)

1640s, "payment for saving a ship from wreck or capture," from French salvage (15c.), from Old French salver "to save" (see save (v.)). The general sense of "the saving of property from danger" is attested from 1878. Meaning "recycling of waste material" is from 1918, from the British effort in World War I.

An allowance or compensation to which those are entitled by whose voluntary exertions, when they were under no legal obligation to render assistance, a ship or goods have been saved from the dangers of the sea, fire, pirates, or enemies. [Century Dictionary]
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