Etymology
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seduction (n.)

1520s, from French séduction, from Latin seductionem (nominative seductio), noun of action from past-participle stem of seducere (see seduce). Originally with reference to actions or beliefs; sexual sense is from 1769, originally always with women as the objects. Earlier appearance of the word in Middle English with a sense "treason, treachery" probably is a confusion with sedition, which confusion also is found in Old French seducion "treason, betrayal."

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seductive (adj.)
1740, from Latin seduct-, past participle stem of seducere (see seduce) + -ive. Related: Seductively; seductiveness. Middle English had seducious "deceitful, devious" (mid-15c.).
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seductress (n.)

1803, "female seducer," with -ess + obsolete seductor (late 15c., displaced by seducer), from a direct borrowing of the Latin agent noun of seducere (see seduce).

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sedulity (n.)
1540s, from Latin sedulitas "assiduity, application," noun of quality from sedulus (see sedulous).
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sedulous (adj.)
1530s, from Latin sedulus "attentive, painstaking, diligent, busy, zealous," probably from sedulo (adv.) "sincerely, diligently," from sedolo "without deception or guile," from se- "without, apart" (see secret (n.)) + dolo, ablative of dolus "deception, guile," cognate with Greek dolos "ruse, snare." Related: Sedulously; sedulousness.
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sedum (n.)
mid-15c., from Latin sedum "houseleek."
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see (v.)

Old English seon "to see, look, behold; observe, perceive, understand; experience, visit, inspect" (contracted class V strong verb; past tense seah, past participle sewen), from Proto-Germanic *sehwanan (source also of Old Saxon, Old High German sehan, Middle High German, German sehen, Old Frisian sia, Middle Dutch sien, Old Norse sja, Gothic saihwan), from PIE root *sekw- (2) "to see," which is probably identical with *sekw- (1) "to follow" (see sequel), a root which produced words for "say" in Greek and Latin, and also words for "follow" (such as Latin sequor), but "opinions differ in regard to the semantic starting-point and sequences" [Buck]. Thus see might originally mean "follow with the eyes."

Used in Middle English to mean "behold in the imagination or in a dream" (c. 1200), "to recognize the force of (a demonstration)," also c. 1200. Sense of "escort" (as in to see (someone) home) first recorded 1607 in Shakespeare. Meaning "to receive as a visitor" is attested from c. 1500. Gambling sense of "equal a bet" is from 1590s. See you as a casual farewell first attested 1891. Let me see as a pausing statement is recorded from 1510s.

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see (n.)
c. 1300, "throne of a bishop, archbishop, or pope," also "throne of a monarch, a goddess, Antichrist, etc.," from Old French sie "seat, throne; town, capital; episcopal see," from Latin sedem (nominative sedes) "seat, throne, abode, temple," related to sedere "to sit," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." Early 14c. as "administrative center of a bishopric;" c. 1400 as "province under the jurisdiction of a bishop."
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seed (n.)

Old English sed, sæd "that which may be sown; an individual grain of seed; offspring, posterity," from Proto-Germanic *sediz "seed" (source also of Old Norse sað, Old Saxon sad, Old Frisian sed, Middle Dutch saet, Old High German sat, German Saat), from PIE *se-ti- "sowing," from root *sē- "to sow." Figurative use in Old English. Meaning "offspring, progeny" rare now except in biblical use. Meaning "semen" is from c. 1300. For sporting sense, see seed (v.).

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seed (v.)
late 14c., "to flower, flourish; produce seed;" mid-15c., "to sow with seed," from seed (n.). Meaning "remove the seeds from" is from 1904. Sporting (originally tennis) sense (1898) is from notion of spreading certain players' names so as to ensure they will not meet early in a tournament. The noun in this sense is attested from 1924. Related: Seeded; seeding.
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