Etymology
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rotor (n.)

1873, an irregular shortening of rotator, originally in mathematics. Mechanical sense of "rotating part of a motor" is attested by 1903; specifically of helicopters from 1930.

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Rototiller (n.)

machine with rotating blades to break up soil, 1923, from roto-, perhaps based on the mechanical use of rotor, + tiller

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rotator (n.)

1670s, "muscle which allows a part to be moved circularly," agent noun from Latin rotare "turn round, revolve" (see rotary). Also compare rotor. General mechanical sense of "one who or that which rotates" is by 1772. Related: Rotatory.

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stator (n.)

"stationary part of a generator" (opposed to rotor), 1895, from Latin stator, agent noun from stare "to stand" (from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm"). In classical Latin it meant "an orderly, attendant upon a proconsul."

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