Etymology
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role (n.)

c. 1600, "part or character one takes," from French rôle "part played by a person in life," literally "roll" (of paper) on which an actor's part is written, from Old French rolle (see roll (n.)). Not originally in English with direct reference to actors and the stage, but figurative of them. The meaning "any conspicuous function performed characteristically by someone" is by 1875. In the social psychology sense is from 1913. Role model, one taken by others as a model in performance of some role, is attested by 1957.

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exit (n.)

1530s (late 15c. as a Latin word in English), originally a stage direction, from Latin exit "he or she goes out," third person singular present indicative of exire "go out, go forth, depart," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Also from Latin exitus "a leaving, a going out," noun of action from exire.

Meaning "a departure" (originally from the stage) is from 1580s. Meaning "a way of departure" is from 1690s; specific meaning "door for leaving" is from 1786. The verb is c. 1600, from the noun; it ought to be left to stage directions and the clunky jargon of police reports. Related: Exited; exiting.

Those who neither know Latin nor read plays are apt to forget or not know that this is a singular verb with plural exeunt. [Fowler]

Exit poll attested by 1980.

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roleplay (n.)

also role-play, "act or condition of behaving as another would behave in a certain situation," 1958, from the verbal phrase, "to act out the role of" (by 1949); see role (n.) + play (v.). Related: Role-playing

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Brexit (n.)

"withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union," 2012, from Britain + exit.

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exeunt (v.)

stage direction, late 15c., from Latin, literally "they go out," third person plural present indicative of exire (see exit).

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recast (v.)

also re-cast, c. 1600, "to throw again," from re- "back, again" + cast (v.). Sense of "to cast or form anew, remodel," especially of literary works and other writing, is from 1790. Meaning "compute anew" is by 1865. Theater sense of "assign an actor or role to another role or actor" is by 1951. Related: Recasting. As a noun, "a fresh molding, arrangement, or modification," by 1840.

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rpg (n.)

by 1979, initialism (acronym) from role-playing game (see roleplay). As an initialism for rocket-propelled grenade, by 1970.

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egress (n.)

1530s, "act of going out," from Latin egressus "a going out," noun use of past participle of egredi "go out," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -gredi, combining form of gradi "step, go" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). Perhaps a back-formation from egression (early 15c.). Meaning "place of exit" is from 1670s. "One who goes out" is an egressor.

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magnetosphere (n.)

coined 1959, from magneto- + sphere. So called because it is the region around the earth (and some other planets) in which the magnetic field of the planet plays a dominant role in the motion of particles.

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showgirl (n.)

"An actress whose role is decorative rather than histrionic" [OED], by 1833, from show (n.) + girl. Earlier "a pretty, talented girl; girl fit to model styles or behavior," by 1816.

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