Etymology
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rigid (adj.)

"stiff, unyielding, inflexible, firm, not easily bent," early 15c., from Latin rigidus "hard, stiff, rough, severe," from rigēre "be stiff" (from PIE root *reig- "stretch; be stretched; be stiff"). Related: Rigidly. As a verb, "to make rigid," rigidize is attested by 1944 in U.S. military and commercial use in reference to metals; earlier was rigidify (1842), rigidification.

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rigidulous (adj.)

"rather stiff," 1858, a dictionary word, as if from a diminutive of Latin rigidus (see rigid).

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rigidity (n.)

1620s, "stiffness, inflexibility," especially in mechanics, "resistance to change of form;" 1620s, from Latin rigiditas "stiffness," from rigidus "hard, stiff, rough, severe" (see rigid). By 1650s as "strictness, severity," but rigidity tends to be used of physical stiffness, while rigor is more active or moral. Rigidness (1640s) "perhaps holds a middle position" [Century Dictionary].

Rigidity is directly opposed to flexibility, and only indirectly to malleability and ductility, which depend chiefly on relations between the tenacity, the rigidity, and the limit of elasticity. [Century Dictionary]
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*reig- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "stretch; be stretched; be stiff" 

It forms all or part of: reach; rigid; rigidity; rigor.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit rjyati "he stretches himself," riag "torture" (by racking); Greek oregein "to reach, extend;" Latin rigidus "hard, stiff, rough, severe," rigēre "be stiff;" Lithuanian raižytis "to stretch oneself;" Old Irish ringid "torture," rigim "I stretch;" Middle High German ric "band, string;" Old High German reihhon, Old English ræcan, ræcean "to reach, achieve," on notion of "to stretch out." 

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prudish (adj.)

"having the character or manner of a prude; prim, rigid, severe," 1717, from prude (adj.) + -ish. Related: Prudishly; prudishness.

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sclerotic (adj.)
early 15c., "pertaining to sclerosis," from medical Latin scleroticus, from Greek skleroun (see sclerosis). Figurative meaning "unchanging, rigid" is from 1961.
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censorious (adj.)
"fond of criticizing," 1530s, from Latin censorius "pertaining to a censor," also "rigid, severe," from censor (see censor (n.)). Related: Censoriously; censoriousness.
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inelastic (adj.)
1748, "not rebounding after a strain," from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + elastic (adj.). Figurative sense "rigid, unyielding" attested by 1867. Related: Inelasticity.
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*ster- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "stiff."

It forms all or part of: cholesterol; redstart; starch; stare; stark; stark-naked; start; startle; starve; stere; stereo-; stern (adj.); stork; strut; torpedo; torpid; torpor.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek stereos "solid," sterizein "to support," sterphnios "stiff, rigid," sterphos "hide, skin;" Sanskrit sthirah "hard, firm," Persian suturg "strong;" Lithuanian storas "thick," strėgti "to become frozen;" Old Church Slavonic trupeti, Lithuanian tirpstu, tirpti "to become rigid;" Old Church Slavonic strublu "strong, hard," staru "old" (hence Russian stary "old"); Old English starian "to stare," stearc "stiff, strong, rigid," steorfan "to die," literally "become stiff," styrne "severe, strict."

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pointer (n.)

mid-14c., "a tiler" (early 13c. as a surname), agent noun from point (v.). From c. 1500 as "maker of needlepoint lace." From 1570s as "thing that points;" meaning "dog that stands rigid in the presence of game, facing the quarry" is recorded from 1717. Meaning "item of advice" is recorded by 1883.

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