Etymology
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riding (n.2)

one of the three districts, anciently under the government of a a reeve,  into which Yorkshire was divided, late 13c., from late Old English *þriðing, a relic of Viking rule, from Old Norse ðriðjungr "third part," from ðriði "third" (see third).

The initial consonant apparently was merged by misdivision with final consonant of preceding north, west, or east.

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riding (n.1)

c. 1300, "an act of riding on horseback," especially in a festival procession, verbal noun from ride (v.). Meaning "teasing, annoying" is from 1927. As an adjective, "suitable for or associated with riding," Old English ridende. Riding-hood, originally a large hood worn by women when riding or exposed to weather, is from mid-15c., later a fashionable article of outdoor wear (18c.). Riding-boots, kind of high boots worn in riding, is from 1630s.

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tubing (n.)
recreational pastime of riding a river on a truck tire inner tube, 1975; see tube (n.).
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oater (n.)

"Western film" (featuring horse-riding cowboys and Indians), 1946, American English, from oat, as the typical food of horses. Oats opera (on the model of soap opera) is by 1937 in U.S. slang.

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inroad (n.)
1540s, "hostile incursion, raid, foray," from in- (2) "in;" second element is road (n.) in the obsolete sense of "riding;" related to raid (v.). Related: Inroads.
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roadway (n.)

"a highway; the part of a road used by horses and vehicles," c. 1600, from road (n.), perhaps preserving some of that word's old sense of "a riding," + way (n.).

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redingote (n.)

"double-breasted outer coat with long plain skirts," also a similar garment for women, 1793, from French redingote (1725), representing a French pronunciation of English riding coat (c. 1500).

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cropper (n.)

"a fall, as in horseback riding, in which the rider is thrown over the horse's head," hence "a failure," 1858, perhaps from crop (n.) in the "top of the head" sense.

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saddle (v.)

Old English sadolian "to put a riding saddle on;" see saddle (n.). The meaning "to load with or as with a burden" is recorded by 1690s. Related: Saddled; saddling.

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