Advertisement
64 entries found.
Search filter: All Results 
ride (v.)

Middle English riden, from Old English ridan "sit or be carried on" (as on horseback), "move forward; rock; float, sail" (class I strong verb; past tense rad, past participle riden), from Proto-Germanic *ridan (source also of Old Norse riða, Old Saxon ridan, Old Frisian rida "to ride," Middle Dutch riden, Dutch rijden, Old High German ritan, German reiten), from PIE *reidh- "to ride" (source also of Old Irish riadaim "I travel," Old Gaulish reda "chariot"). Common to Celtic and Germanic, perhaps a loan word from one to the other.

Of a ship, "to sail, float, rock," c. 1300. The meaning "heckle" is by 1912 from earlier sense of "dominate cruelly, have the mastery of, harass at will" (1580s) on the notion of "control and manage," as a rider does a horse, especially harshly or arrogantly. The verb in venery is from mid-13c.

To ride out "endure (a storm, etc.) without great damage" is from 1520s, literal and figurative. To let (something) ride "allow to pass without comment or intervention" is by 1921. To ride herd on "guard and control" is by 1897, from cattle-driving. To ride shotgun "ride in the passenger seat of an automobile" is by 1919, from the custom of having an armed man up beside the driver of a stagecoach to ward off trouble. To ride shank's mare "walk" is from 1846 (see shank (n.)). The ____ rides again cliche is from Hollywood movie titles ("Destry Rides Again," 1939).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ride (n.)

1759, "a journey on the back of a horse or in a vehicle," from ride (v.).

By 1815 as "a turn or spell of riding." By 1787 as "a saddle horse;" slang meaning "a motor vehicle" is recorded from 1930. The sense of "amusement park device" is from 1934.

The noun in the venery sense is from 1937. To take (someone) for a ride "tease, mislead, cheat," is first attested 1925, American English, possibly from underworld sense of "take on a car trip with intent to kill" (1927). Phrase go along for the ride in the figurative sense "join in passively" is from 1956.

A ride cymbal (1956) is used by jazz drummers for keeping up continuous rhythm, as opposed to a crash cymbal (ride as "rhythm" in jazz slang is recorded from 1936).

Related entries & more 
hay-ride (n.)
also hayride, "a ride in a hay cart for pleasure or entertainment," 1878, from hay (n.) + ride (n.).
Related entries & more 
ridden (adj.)

mid-14c., "that has ridden or travelled," past-participle adjective from ride (v.). The sense evolution, via horses, is from "that which has been ridden upon" to "broken in" (1520s) to, in compounds, "oppressed, taken advantage of" (1650s). In reference to witches, nightmares, etc., "to sit on or to ride as a horse" by 1590s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
bedridden (adj.)
also bed-ridden, "confined to bed by age, infirmity, or sickness," mid-14c., from late Old English bæddrædæn "bedridden," adjective from bedreda "bedridden (man)," literally "bedrider," from bed + rida "rider" (see ride (v.)). Originally a noun, it became an adjective and acquired an -en on the analogy of past-participle adjectives from strong verbs such as ride.
Related entries & more 
riding (n.1)

c. 1300, "an act of riding on horseback," especially in a festival procession, verbal noun from ride (v.). Meaning "teasing, annoying" is from 1927. As an adjective, "suitable for or associated with riding," Old English ridende. Riding-hood, originally a large hood worn by women when riding or exposed to weather, is from mid-15c., later a fashionable article of outdoor wear (18c.). Riding-boots, kind of high boots worn in riding, is from 1630s.

Related entries & more 
rider (n.)

late Old English ridere "one who rides, trooper, knight, mounted warrior," agent noun from ride (v.). Compare Middle Dutch rider, Dutch rijder, Old High German ritari, German Reiter, Old Norse riðeri; "It is uncertain how far the forms were independently developed in these languages" [OED]. As "one who is carried along on or in" (a chariot, cart, etc.), from c. 1200. Meaning "clause tacked on to a document after first draft" is from 1660s.

Related entries & more 
override (v.)

Middle English overriden, from Old English oferridan "to ride across, ride through or over," from ofer "over" (see over) + ridan "to ride" (see ride (v.)). Originally literal, of cavalry, etc. Figurative meaning "to set aside arrogantly" is by 1827, from the notion of "to trample down," hence "supersede." The mechanical sense "to suspend automatic operation" is attested from 1946. As a noun in the sense "act or process of suspending automatic operation," from 1946. Related: Overrode; overriding; overridden.

And þanne þeze Frenschmen come prikkyng doun as þei wolde haue ouyr-rydyn alle oure meyne; but God and our archers made hem sone to stomble. [Layamon, from the description of the Battle of Agincourt in "The Brut, or The Chronicles of England"] 
Related entries & more 
palfrey (n.)

c. 1200, palefrei (mid-12c. as a surname), "saddle horse for ordinary riding (opposed to a war horse), a fine, small horse for ladies," from Old French palefroi (11c., palefreid) and directly from Medieval Latin palafredus, altered by dissimilation from Late Latin paraveredus "post horse for outlying districts" (6c.), originally "extra horse," from Greek para "beside, secondary" (see para-) + Medieval Latin veredus "post horse; light, fast horse used by couriers," which is probably from Gaulish *voredos, from Celtic *wo-red- (source also of Welsh gorwydd "horse," Old Irish riadaim "I ride"), from PIE root *reidh- "to ride" (see ride (v.)). The Latin word passed to Old High German as pfarifrid, and in modern German it has become the usual word for "horse" (Pferd).

Related entries & more