Etymology
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rid (v.)

c. 1200, ridden, "clear (a space); set free, save," from Old English *ryddan (past participle geryd) or else from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse ryðja (past tense ruddi, past participle ruddr) "to clear (land) of obstructions," from Proto-Germanic *reudijan (source also of Old High German riuten, German reuten "to clear land," Old Frisian rothia "to clear," Old English -royd "clearing," common in northern place names), from PIE root *reudh- "to clear land."

Meaning "be rid of, be freed from" (something troublesome or useless) is from mid-15c. The general sense of "to make (someone or someplace) free (of someone or something else)" emerged by 16c. The senses have merged somewhat with those in Northern English, Scottish, and U.S. dialectal redd (q.v.). To get rid of (something or someone) is from 1660s. Related: Ridden; ridding.

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riddance (n.)

1530s, "a cleaning out, removal, clearance," from rid + -ance. The meaning "a deliverance from something superfluous or unwanted" is from 1590s. Good riddance, "a welcome relief from unpleasant company or an embarrassing connection" attested from 1650s. Shakespeare has gentle riddance (1590s); Middleton has fair riddance (1610s).

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redd (v.)

also red, c. 1300, redden, "to clear" (a space, etc.), "rid of encumbrance," from Old English hreddan "to save, free from (Satan, guilt, etc.), deliver, recover, rescue," from Proto-Germanic *hradjan (source also of Old Frisian hredda, Dutch redden, Old High German retten).

Sense evolution tended to merge it with unrelated rid. It is also possibly influenced by Old English rædan "to arrange," which is related to Old English geræde, source of ready (adj.). Related: Redding.

A dialect word in Scotland and northern England, where it has had senses of "to fix" (boundaries), "to comb" (out one's hair), "to separate" (combatants), "to settle" (a quarrel). The exception to the limited use is the meaning "to put in order, to make neat or trim" (1718), especially in redd up, which is in general use in England and the U.S. The same phrase, in the same sense, in Pennsylvania Dutch may be from cognate Low German and Dutch redden, obviously connected historically to the English word, "but the origin and relationship of the forms is not clear" [OED].

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shop-worn (adj.)

"somewhat shabby from handling while on display," by 1811, from shop (n.) + worn (adj.). Shop-soiled in the same sense is by 1862. An earlier nonce-use was shop-rid (1610s), based on bed-rid.

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decolonialize (v.)

"to rid of the system or qualities of colonialism," by 1955; see  de- + colonial + -ize. Related: Decolonialization.

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shet 

1837, in Georgia vernacular, representing a U.S. colloquial pronunciation of shut. Especially in the expression get shet of "get rid of."

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Barn-burner (n.)
also barnburner, by 1844, American English, a member of the more progressive faction of the New York Democratic Party (opposed to the Hunkers); the nickname is an allusion to the old story of the farmer who, to rid his barn of rats, burned it down.
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dust (v.)

c. 1200, "to rise in the air as dust;" later "to sprinkle with dust" (1590s) and "to rid of dust" (1560s); from dust (n.). Related: Dusted; dusting. Sense of "to kill" is U.S. slang first recorded 1938 (compare bite the dust under dust (n.)).

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rill (n.)
"small brook, rivulet," 1530s, from or related to Dutch and Frisian ril, Low German rille "groove, furrow, running stream," probably from Proto-Germanic *ril- (source also of Old English rið, riþe "brook, stream," which survives only in dialects), a diminutive form from PIE root *rei- "to run, flow."
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white elephant (n.)
"burdensome charge, inconvenient thing that one does not know how to get rid of," 1851, supposedly from the practice of the King of Siam of presenting one of the sacred albino elephants to a courtier who had fallen from favor; the gift was a great honor, but the proper upkeep of one was ruinously expensive.
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