Etymology
Advertisement
rice (n.)

mid-13c., ris, "edible seeds or grains of the rice plant, one of the world's major food grains," from Old French ris, from Italian riso, from Latin oriza, from Greek oryza "rice," via an Indo-Iranian language (compare Pashto vriže, Old Persian brizi), ultimately from Sanskrit vrihi-s "rice."

The Greek word, directly or in indirectly, is the source of the European words for the grain (Welsh reis, German reis, Lithuanian ryžiai, Serbo-Croatian riza, Polish ryż, etc.). Evidence of semi-cultivated rice in Thailand dates to 5,500 years ago; introduced to the Mediterranean by the Arabs, it was introduced 1647 in the Carolinas.

Rice paper (1810), originally used in China, Japan, etc., is made from straw of rice; the name is sometimes misapplied to a delicate white film prepared from the pith of a certain East Asian shrub. Rice-pudding is by 1889. Rice Krispies is from 1936.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
risotto (n.)
rice cooked in broth with meat and cheese, 1848, from Italian risotto, from riso "rice" (see rice). At first in Italian contexts; it begins to appear in English cookery books c. 1880.
Related entries & more 
paddy (n.1)

1620s, "rice plant," from Malay (Austronesian) padi "rice in the straw." Main modern meaning "rice field, ground where rice is growing" (1948) is a shortening of paddy field.

Related entries & more 
Akita 
type of dog, named for a prefecture in northern Japan. The place name is said to mean literally "field of ripe rice," from aki "autumn, fall" + ta "field of rice."
Related entries & more 
basmati (n.)
"superior variety of rice," 1845, from Hindi, literally "fragrant."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Menominee 

also Menomini, Algonquian people of Wisconsin, also of their language, from Ojibwa (Algonquian) Manoominii, literally "wild rice people," from manoomin "wild rice." Not their name for themselves.

Related entries & more 
Tarzan 
name of character in a series of novels by U.S. fiction writer Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950), introduced 1914.
Related entries & more 
sake (n.2)

Japanese fermented liquor made from rice, 1680s, from Japanese sake, literally "alcohol."

Related entries & more 
zori (n.)
1823, from Japanese zori, from so "grass, (rice) straw" + ri "footwear, sole."
Related entries & more 
sushi (n.)
1893, from Japanese, where it is said originally to refer to the vinegared rice, not the raw fish.
Related entries & more