Etymology
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movement (n.)

late 14c., mevement, "change of position; passage from place to place," from Old French movement "movement, exercise; start, instigation" (Modern French mouvement), from Medieval Latin movimentum, from Latin movere "to move, set in motion" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away"). In the musical sense of "major division of a piece" it is attested from 1776; in the political/artistic/social sense of "course of acts and endeavors by a body of persons toward some specific end" is from 1828. Related: Movements.

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revitalization (n.)

"act or fact of being given fresh life and vigor, act of revitalizing," 1869, noun of action from revitalize.

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Brownian movement (n.)

"rapid oscillatory motion observed in very small particles," 1850, for Scottish scientist Dr. Robert Brown (1773-1858), who first described it.

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kinesis (n.)

"physical movement, muscular action," 1819, from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move," from PIE *kie-neu-, suffixed form of root *keie- "set in motion."

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slither (n.)

"slithering movement," 1861, from slither (v.).

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REM (n.2)

also R.E.M., rem, 1957, initialism (acronym) for rapid eye movement.

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Ustashi 

Croatian separatise movement, 1932, from Croatian Ustaše, plural of Ustaša "insurgent, rebel."

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motile (adj.)

"capable of spontaneous movement," 1831, back-formation from motility.

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glance (n.)

c. 1500, "a sudden movement producing a flash," from glance (v.). Meaning "brief or hurried look" is from 1590s.

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ascent (n.)

c. 1610, "action of rising, upward movement," from ascend on model of descend/descent. The meaning "act of climbing" is from 1753.

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