Etymology
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resultant (n.)

mid-15c., in mathematics, "the total or sum, the sum of an addition or product of a multiplication," from Medieval Latin resultantem (nominative resultans), present participle of resultare "to result" (see result (v.)). Sense in mechanics is from 1815.

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resultant (adj.)

"existing or following as a consequence, resulting," 1630s, from resultant (adj.) and from Medieval Latin resultantem (nominative resultans), present participle of resultare "to result" (see result (v.)).

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outspoken (adj.)

"given to speaking freely, candid, free or bold of speech," 1808, originally Scottish, from out- + -spoken. According to OED, the past participle "has here a resultant force, as in 'well spoken', 'well read'." Related: Outspokenly; outspokenness. Earlier was outspeaking, in reference to the voice, "loud, resonant" (mid-15c.).

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