Etymology
Advertisement
restoration (n.)

late 14c., restoracioun, "a means of healing or restoring health, a cure; renewing of something lost," from Old French restoration (Modern French restauration) and directly from Late Latin restorationem (nominative restoratio) "a restoration, renewal," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin restaurare (see restore).

Also used in Middle English were restorement (14c.), restoring (mid-14c.). From mid-15c. as "the repairing of a damaged or deteriorated building;" from c. 1500 as "a restoring to a former state."

The Restoration (1718) refers to the re-establishment of the monarchy under Charles II in 1660 (and by extension his whole reign); as an adjective in reference to the English theater of this period, by 1898. In French history, it refers to the (briefly interrupted) reinstatement of the Bourbons in 1814.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
restorationist (n.)

1788, "one who believes in the final restoration of all to God's favor after temporary punishment of the impenitent," from restoration + -ist. Related: Restorationism. Regarded from without as a form of universalism but a subject of contention in the sect 1820s-30s. As "one who restores dilapidated buildings," by 1877 (implied, perhaps, in anti-restorationist; at any rate, restorationist is by 1880).

Related entries & more 
healing (n.)
"restoration to health," Old English hæling, verbal noun from heal (v.). Figurative sense of "restoration of wholeness" is from early 13c.; meaning "touch that cures" is from 1670s.
Related entries & more 
repair (n.1)

c. 1400, repaire, "maintenance, restoration;" 1590s, "act of restoring, restoration to a sound or good state after decay," from repair (v.1). Meaning "state or condition in respect to reparation" is from c. 1600, especially "good or sound condition kept up by repairing as needed." Repair-shop attested by 1877.

Related entries & more 
reinstatement (n.)

also re-instatement, "restoration to a former post, office, rank, etc.," 1700, from reinstate (v.) + -ment. Reinstation is recorded from 1680s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
reassurance (n.)

also re-assurance, 1610s, "assurance or confirmation repeated," from reassure + -ance. Meaning "restoration of courage or confidence" is by 1875.

Related entries & more 
reintegration (n.)

"a renewing or making whole again, restoration, re-establishment," c. 1600, from French réintegration (15c.) or directly from Medieval Latin reintegrationem; see reintegrate. The classically correct form is redintegration (see redintegrate (v.)).

Related entries & more 
redux (adj.)

"restored, brought back," as from a distance, captivity, etc., Latin redux "that leads or brings back; led or brought back," from reducere (see reduce). In book titles at least since 1662 (Dryden, "Astraea Redux," written on the restoration of Charles II).

Related entries & more 
integration (n.)
1610s, "act of bringing together the parts of a whole," from French intégration and directly from Late Latin integrationem (nominative integratio) "renewal, restoration," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin integrare "make whole," also "renew, begin again" (see integrate). Anti-discrimination sense (opposed to segregation) is recorded from 1934.
Related entries & more 
resuscitation (n.)

early 15c., resuscitacion, "resurrection of a dead person (as in apparent drownings, etc.), restoration to life," also figurative, "revival, revivification," from Old French resuscitation or directly from Late Latin resuscitationem (nominative resuscitatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of resuscitare "rouse again, revive" (see resuscitate).

Related entries & more