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response (n.)

c. 1300, respounse, "an answer, a reply," from Old French respons (Modern French réponse) and directly from Latin responsum "an answer," noun use of neuter past participle of respondere "respond, answer to, promise in return," from re- "back" (see re-) + spondere "to pledge" (see sponsor (n.)).

The transferred sense, of feelings or actions, is from 1815 in poetry and psychology. The meaning "a part of the liturgy said or sung by the congregation in reply to the priest" is by 1650s. Response time attested from 1958.

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counter-offer (n.)

also counteroffer, "offer made in response to another," 1788, from counter- + offer (n.).

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countermeasure (n.)

"action taken in response to a danger or threat," 1855, from counter- + measure (n.).

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deafening (adj.)

"very loud," 1590s, present-participle adjective from deafen (q.v.). Deafening silence "heavy and conspicuous silence," especially as a response to a question, is attested by 1830.

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reply (n.)

"an answer, a response," especially one in words or writing, 1550s, from reply (v.).

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ho-de-ho (interj.)
1932, defined in the "Oxford English Dictionary" as "An exclamation, used as the appropriate response to HI-DE-HI."
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Counter-reformation 

"the resurgence of the Catholic Church from mid-16c. to early 17c. in response to the Protestant Reformation," 1840, from counter- + Reformation.

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perseverate (v.)

"repeat a response after the cessation of the original stimulus," by 1909, in psychology, a back-formation from perseveration. Related: Perseverating; perseverative.

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reciprocate (v.)

1610s, "to give and return mutually," a back-formation from reciprocation, or else from Latin reciprocatus, past participle of reciprocare "rise and fall, move back and forth; reverse the motion of," from reciprocus "returning the same way, alternating" (see reciprocal). Sense of "cause to move back and forth" is from 1650s; intransitive sense of "move backward and forward" is from 1670s. Meaning "to give or do in response, act in return or response" is from 1820. Related: Reciprocated; reciprocating.

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phototropism (n.)

"innate movement of a plant or other organism in response to the stimulation of light," 1899, based on German phototropie (1892); see photo- + tropism. Related: Phototropic.

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