Etymology
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mobilization (n.)

1799, "a rendering movable," from French mobilisation, from mobiliser (see mobilize). Military sense of "act of putting in readiness for service" is from 1866. Sociological sense of "organizing of latent social energy to bring about change in society" is by 1953.

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resource (v.)

"supply with resources," 1975, from resource (n.). Related: Resourced; resourcing.

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resource (n.)

1610s, "any means of supplying a want or deficiency," from French resourse "a source, a spring," noun use of fem. past participle of Old French resourdre "to rally, raise again," from Latin resurgere "rise again" (see resurgent).

The meaning "possibility of aid or assistance" (often with a negative) is by 1690s; the meaning "expedient, device, shift" also is from 1690s. Resources as "a country's wealth, means of raising money and supplies" is recorded by 1779. A library resource center was so called by 1968.

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theory (n.)

1590s, "conception, mental scheme," from Late Latin theoria (Jerome), from Greek theōria "contemplation, speculation; a looking at, viewing; a sight, show, spectacle, things looked at," from theōrein "to consider, speculate, look at," from theōros "spectator," from thea "a view" (see theater) + horan "to see," which is possibly from PIE root *wer- (3) "to perceive." Philosophy credits sense evolution in the Greek word to Pythagoras.

Earlier in this sense was theorical (n.), late 15c. Sense of "principles or methods of a science or art" (rather than its practice) is first recorded 1610s (as in music theory, which is the science of musical composition, apart from practice or performance). Sense of "an intelligible explanation based on observation and reasoning" is from 1630s.

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mobilisation (n.)
chiefly British English spelling of mobilization. For spelling, see -ize.
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URL 
by 1990, initialism (acronym) from uniform resource locator.
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demobilization (n.)

"action of disbanding troops; reduction of military forces to a peace status," 1866 (in reference to the Austro-Prussian War); see de- (privative) + mobilization. Earlier in German.

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resourceful (adj.)

1807, "shifty, fertile in expedient," from resource (n.) + -ful. By 1847 as "rich or abounding in resources." Related: Resourcefully; resourcefulness. Resourceless is from 1787.

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theorist (n.)
"one given to theory and speculation," 1590s; see theory + -ist.
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theoretical (adj.)
1610s, "contemplative," with -al (1) + Late Latin theoreticus "of or pertaining to theory," from Greek theoretikos "contemplative, speculative, pertaining to theory" (by Aristotle contrasted to praktikos), from theoretos "that may be seen or considered," from theorein "to consider, look at" (see theory). Meaning "pertaining to theory, making deductions from theory not from fact" (opposed to practical) is from 1650s; earlier in this sense was theorical (c. 1500). Meaning "ideal, hypothetical" is from 1790s (implied in theoretically). Related: theoretician.
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