Etymology
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resin (n.)

hardened secretions of various plants, used in medicine, varnishes, etc., late 14c., from Old French resine "gum, resin," and directly from Latin resina "resin," from Greek rhetine "resin of the pine," a word of unknown origin. Applied to synthetic products by 1883. Related: Resiniferous.

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resinate (v.)

"impregnate with resin," 1756, from resin + -ate (2). Related: Resinated; resinating.

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resinous (adj.)

"of the nature of, pertaining to, or obtained from resin," 1640s, from Latin resinosus, from resina (see resin). Resiny "having a character or quality like resin" is attested from 1570s.

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rosin (n.)

"distillate of turpentine," especially when in a solid state and employed for ordinary purposes, late 13c., from Old French raisine, rousine, variants of résine (see resin). The verb, "to cover or rub with rosin," is from mid-14c. Related: Rosined; rosining.

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cud (n.)

"portion of food voluntarily forced into the mouth by the stomach of a ruminating animal," Old English cudu "cud," also "gum, resin, mastic," earlier cwudu, from Proto-Germanic *kweduz "resin" (source also of Old Norse kvaða "resin," Old High German quiti "glue," German Kitt "putty").

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styrene (n.)
colorless hydrocarbon, 1885, from Styrax, name of a genus of trees (the chemical is found in their resin), 1786, from Latin styrax, from Greek styrax, the tree name, of Semitic origin (compare Hebrew tsori "terebinth resin"). Form influenced by Greek styrax "shaft of a lance."
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polyurethane (n.)

type of synthetic resin or plastic made from polymers, 1944, from polymer + urethane.

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polystyrene (n.)

hard, colorless thermoplastic resin, 1922, so called because it is a polymer of styrene.

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Qatar 

peninsula-state in the Persian Gulf, probably from Arabic katran "tar, resin," in reference to petroleum. The Romans knew it as Catara. Related: Qatari.

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gum (n.1)
c. 1300, "resin from dried sap of plants," from Old French gome "(medicinal) gum, resin," from Late Latin gumma, from Latin gummi, from Greek kommi "gum," from Egyptian kemai. As the name of a hardened, sweetened gelatine mixture as a candy, 1827. As a shortened form of chewing gum, first attested 1842 in American English. The gum tree (1670s) was so called for the resin it exudes. Latin gummi also is the source of German Gummi (13c.).
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