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repeat (v.)

late 14c., repēten "to say what one has already said," from Old French repeter "say or do again, get back, demand the return of" (13c., Modern French répéeter) and directly from Latin repetere "do or say again; attack again," from re- "again" (see re-) + petere "to go to; attack; strive after; ask for, beseech" (from PIE root *pet- "to rush, to fly").

Meaning "say what another has said" is from 1590s. As an emphatic word in radio broadcasts, 1938. Meaning "do over again; do, make, or perform again" is from 1550s; the specific meaning "to take a course of education over again" is recorded from 1945, American English. Intransitive sense of "perform some distinctive (but unspecified) function again or a second time" is by 1714. Related: Repeated; repeating.

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repeat (n.)

mid-15c., repete, in music, "a repeated passage, a passage performed a second time," from repeat (v.). By 1660s in reference to the sign in musical notation which indicates this. By 1937 of a repetition of a broadcast program.

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repeated (adj.)
"frequent," 1610s, past-participle adjective from repeat (v.). Related: Repeatedly.
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repeater (n.)

"one who repeats or rehearses," in any sense, 1570s, agent noun from repeat (v.). As a type of watch, by 1725; as "a repeating firearm," from 1849; as "a frequent offender" from 1868. Also in U.S. history, "one who votes more than once in the same election" (1868).

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repetitious (adj.)

"employing repetition," often with suggestions of tiresomeness, 1670s, from Latin repetit-, past-participle stem of repetere "do or say again" (see repeat (v.)) + -ous. Compare repetitive. Regarded in 19c. England as an Americanism. Related: Repetitiously; repetitiousness.

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repetition (n.)

early 15c., repeticioun, "act of saying over again," from Old French repetition and directly from Latin repetitionem (nominative repetitio) "a repeating," noun of action from past-participle stem of repetere "do or say again" (see repeat (v.)). Of actions or events recurring or done again, attested from 1590s; specifically in physical fitness from 1958. Related: Repetitions.

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repetitive (adj.)

"containing repetitions, characterized by or of the nature of repetition," 1805, from Latin repetit-, past-participle stem of repetere "do or say again" (see repeat (v.)) + -ive. Related: Repetitively; repetitiveness. Other adjectives, in addition to repetitious (1670s) included repetitionary (1720), repetitional (1720).

repetitional, repetitionary, repetitious, repetitive. With all these on record, repetition would seem to have a good stock of adjectives at need ; but few writers have the hardihood to use any of them. Repetitious is said to be 'common in recent American use' ; repetitive is perhaps the least avoided in England. [Fowler, 1926]
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*pet- 

Also petə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to rush, to fly." 

It forms all or part of: accipiter; appetence; appetite; apterous; apteryx; archaeopteryx; asymptote; centripetal; Coleoptera; compete; competent; eurypterid; feather; helicopter; hippopotamus; Hymenoptera; impetigo; impetuous; impetus; iopterous; Lepidoptera; ornithopter; panache; panne; pen (n.1) "writing implement;" pennon; peripeteia; perpetual; perpetuity; petition; petulance; petulant; pin; pinion; pinnacle; pinnate; pinniped; potamo-; potamology; propitiation; propitious; ptero-; pterodactyl; ptomaine; ptosis; repeat; symptom.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit pattram "wing, feather, leaf," patara- "flying, fleeting;" Hittite pittar "wing;" Greek piptein "to fall," potamos "river, rushing water," pteron, pteryx "feather, wing," ptilon "soft feathers, down, plume;" Latin petere "to attack, assail; seek, strive after; ask for, beg; demand, require," penna "feather, wing;" Old Norse fjöðr, Old English feðer "feather;" Old Church Slavonic pero "feather;" Old Welsh eterin "bird."

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reiterate (v.)

early 15c., reiteraten, "to repeat (an action or process) again and again," originally in medicine and alchemy, from Late Latin reiteratus, past participle of reiterare "to repeat," from re- "again" (see re-) + iterare "to repeat," from iterum "again" (see iteration). From mid-16c. especially "to say repeatedly, give repeated expression to." Related: Reiterated; reiterating.

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iterate (v.)
1530s, "to do again, repeat," back-formation from iteration, or else from Latin iteratus, past participle of iterare "do again, repeat." Related: Iterated; iterating.
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