Etymology
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renovation (n.)

c. 1400, renovacyoun, in theology, "spiritual rebirth wrought by the Holy Spirit," also in a general sense, "rebuilding, reconstruction; a making new after decay, destruction, or impairment," from Old French renovacion (13c.) and directly from Latin renovationem (nominative renovatio) "a renewing, renewal; a rest," noun of action from past-participle stem of renovare "renew, restore," from re- "again" (see re-) + novare "make new," from novus "new" (see new).

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renovate (v.)

1520s, "render as good as new (materially), restore to a good condition," a back-formation from renovation or else from Latin renovatus, past participle of renovare "renew, restore." Related: Renovated; renovating.

Earlier verbs were renovelen "renew, repair, rebuild" (early 14c., from Old French renoveler); renoven "become renewed; renew," early 15c., from Old French renover from Latin renovare). Later, renovize was tried as a contraction of renovate and modernize (1933).

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novation (n.)

"replacement of an old obligation by a new one," 1530s, from Latin novationem (nominative novatio) "a making new, renewal, renovation," noun of action from past-participle stem of novare "make new, renew, make fresh," from novus "new" (see new).

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