Etymology
Advertisement
remote (adj.)

mid-15c., "distant in place, apart, removed, not near," from Latin remotus "afar off, remote, distant in place," past participle of removere "move back or away, take away, put out of view, subtract," from re- "back, away" (see re-) + movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away"). Related: Remotely; remoteness.

The meaning "distant" in any sense is from 1590s; by 1711 as "slight, inconsiderable" (of resemblances, chances, etc.). Remote control "fact of controlling from a distance" is recorded from 1904; as a device which allows this from 1920.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
*meue- 
*meuə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to push away."

It forms all or part of: commotion; emotion; mob; mobile; moment; momentary; momentous; momentum; motif; motility; motion; motive; moto-; motor; move; movement; mutiny; premotion; promote; remote; remove.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit kama-muta "moved by love" and probably mivati "pushes, moves;" Greek ameusasthai "to surpass," amyno "push away;" Latin movere "move, set in motion;" Lithuanian mauti "push on."
Related entries & more 
longinquity (n.)
"remoteness," 1540s, from Latin longinquitas "length, extent, duration," from longinquus "long, extensive, remote, distant," from longus "long; distant, remote" (see long (adj.)) + suffix -inquus.
Related entries & more 
farther (adj.)
late 14c., "front;" variant of further (adj.). From 1510s as "additional;" 1560s as "more remote."
Related entries & more 
off-chance (n.)

"a remote chance," 1861, from off (prep.) + chance (n.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
farthest (adj.)
"most distant or remote," late 14c., superlative of far.
Related entries & more 
far-off (adj.)
also faroff, "distant, remote," 1590s, from adverbial phrase, from far (adv.) + off (adv.).
Related entries & more 
far-away (adj.)
also faraway, "distant, remote," 1816, from far + away.
Related entries & more 
boondocks (n.)
"remote and wild place," 1910s, from Tagalog bundok "mountain." Adopted by occupying American soldiers in the Philippines for "remote and wild place." Reinforced or re-adopted during World War II. Hence, also boondockers "shoes suited for rough terrain," originally (1944) U.S. services slang word for field boots.
Related entries & more 
atavic (adj.)

"pertaining to a remote ancestor, exhibiting atavism," 1850, from Latin atavus "ancestor" (see atavism) + -ic.

Related entries & more