Etymology
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remember (v.)

mid-14c., remembren, "keep or bear (something or someone) in mind, retain in the memory, preserve unforgotten," from Old French remembrer "remember, recall, bring to mind" (11c.), from Latin rememorari "recall to mind, remember," from re- "again" (see re-) + memorari "be mindful of," from memor "mindful" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember").

The meaning "recall to mind, bring again to the memory" is from late 14c.; the sense of "to mention" is from 1550s. Also in Middle English "to remind" (someone), "bring back the memory of" (something to someone); "give an account, narrate," and in passive constructions such as hit remembreth me "I remember." An Anglo-Saxon verb for it was gemunan.

The insertion of -b- between -m- and a following consonant (especially where a vowel has dropped out) is regular: compare number (n.), chamber (n.), humble (adj.).

Remember implies that a thing exists in the memory, not that it is actually present in the thoughts at the moment, but that it recurs without effort. Recollect means that a fact, forgotten or partially lost to memory, is after some effort recalled and present to the mind. Remembrance is the store-house, recollection the act of culling out this article and that from the repository. He remembers everything he hears, and can recollect any statement when called on. The words, however, are often confounded, and we say we cannot remember a thing when we mean we cannot recollect it. [Century Dictionary, 1895]

In complimentary messages, "remember (one) to (another), recall one to the remembrance of another," as in remember me to your family, is attested from 1550s.

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misremember (v.)

"mistake in calling to mind," 1530s, from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + remember. Related: Misremembered; misremembering.

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disremember (v.)

"forget, not remember," 1805, a colloquialism, from dis- "opposite of" + remember. Related: Disremembered; disremembering.

The improvements which are daily ushered to the world in our vernacular tongue afford reason to hope that it must soon arrive at the acme of perfection. With a great many of our wise folk, the old, absurd word forget is given over to oblivion, and the sonorous and elegant word dis-remember has completely taken its place. Ask one of these men any question to which he cannot return a ready answer, and he informs you that he dis-remembers. [The Port Folio, March 1810]
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remembrance (n.)

c. 1300, remembraunce, "a memory, recollection," from Old French remembrance (11c.), from remembrer (see remember). From late 14c. as "consideration, reflection; present consciousness of a past event; store of personal experiences available to recollection, capacity to recall the past." Also late 14c. as "memento, keepsake, souvenir," and "a commemoration, remembering, ritual of commemoration." Meaning "faculty of memory, capability of remembering" is from early 15c.

British Remembrance Day, the Sunday nearest Nov. 11 (originally in memory of the dead of World War I) is attested from 1921. A remembrancer (early 15c.) was a royal official of the Exchequer tasked with recording and collecting debts due to the Crown; hence also, figuratively "Death" (late 15c.).

To us old lads some thoughts come home
Who roamed a world young lads no more shall roam.
[Melville, from "To Ned"]
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bethink (v.)
reflexive verb, Old English beþencan "to consider, remember, take thought for, reflect," from be- + þencan "to think" (see think). Related: Bethought.
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anamnestic (adj.)
1753, from Latinized form of Greek anamnestikos "able to recall to mind," from stem of anamimneskein "remember" (see anamnesis).
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reminiscent (adj.)

1705, "pertaining to or characterized by reminiscence," from Latin reminiscentem (nominative reminiscens), present participle of reminisci "remember, call to mind," from re- "again" (see re-) + minisci "to remember" (from root of mens "mind," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think"). By 1880 as "calling to mind, evoking a reminiscence (of someone or something)." Related: Reminiscential "of the nature of reminiscence" (1640s).

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memento (n.)

late 14c., "Psalm cxxxi in the Canon of the Mass" (which begins with the Latin word Memento and in which the dead are commemorated), from Latin memento "remember," second person singular imperative of meminisse "to remember, recollect, think of, bear in mind," a reduplicated form, related to mens "mind," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think." Meaning "a hint or suggestion to awaken memory, a reminder, an object serving as a warning" is from 1580s; sense of "keepsake" is recorded by 1768.

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anamnesis (n.)
"recollection, remembrance, reminiscence," 1650s, from Greek anamnesis "a calling to mind, remembrance," noun of action from stem of anamimneskein "remember, remind (someone) of (something), make mention of," from ana "back" (see ana-) + mimneskesthai "to recall, cause to remember," related to mnemnon "mindful," mneme "memory;" from PIE root *men- (1) "to think." In Platonic philosophy, "recollection of a prior life."
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Clytaemnestra 
also Clytemnestra, wife and murderess of Agamemnon, from Greek Klytaimnestra, from klytos "celebrated, heard of" (see loud) + mnester "wooer, suitor," literally "willing to mind, mindful of," related to mnasthai "to remember," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think."
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