Etymology
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reinstate (v.)

also re-instate, "place again in a former state or condition," 1590s, from re- "back, again" + instate (v.). Related: Reinstated; reinstating.

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reinstatement (n.)

also re-instatement, "restoration to a former post, office, rank, etc.," 1700, from reinstate (v.) + -ment. Reinstation is recorded from 1680s.

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reintegrate (v.)

c. 1600, "renew with regard to any state or quality," from re- "back," here "to a former condition," + integrate (v.). The sense of "make whole again, bring back to an integral condition" is from 1620s. The classically correct form is redintegrate (early 15c.). Earlier in a now-obsolete sense of "reinstate oneself" (1580s). Related: Reintegrated; reintegrating; reintegration.

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restitution (n.)

early 14c., restitucioun, "a making good or giving equivalent for crime, debt, injury, etc.;" late 14c., "restoration of goods, land, etc. to a former owner, repayment of money;" from Old French restitucion or directly from Latin restitutionem (nominative restitutio) "a restoring," noun of action from past-participle stem of restituere "set up again, restore, rebuild, replace, revive, reinstate, re-establish," from re- "again, to a former state" (see re-) + statuere "to set up" (from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm").

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