Etymology
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refusal (n.)

late 15c., refusel, "act of refusing to do something, rejection of anything demanded," from refuse (v.) + -al (2). The sense of "choice of refusing or taking," as in right of first refusal, is by 1570s. The earlier noun was simply refuse (late 14c., from Old French refus), which was common through 16c.

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non-admission (n.)

also nonadmission, "the refusal of admission," 1680s, from non- + admission.

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recalcitrance (n.)

"refusal of submission, obstinate noncompliance or nonconformity," 1845, from French récalcitrance or a native formation from recalcitrant + -ance.

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non-cooperation (n.)

also noncooperation, "failure or refusal to cooperate," 1795, from non- + cooperation.

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rebuff (n.)

"a repelling; a check, a defeat; peremptory denial or refusal," 1610s, from rebuff (v.), or from French rebuffe or Italian ribuffo.

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non-compliance (n.)

also noncompliance, "failure or refusal to comply," 1680s, from non- + compliance. Related: Noncompliant.

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non-committal (adj.)

also noncommittal, "characterized by refusal to commit oneself, disinclined to express an opinion one way or another, free from pledge or entanglement of any kind," 1829, from non- + committal (adj.). Related: Non-committally.

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denial (n.)

1520s, "refusal to grant what is requested or desired;" see deny + -al (2). Replaced earlier denyance (late 15c.). Sense of "act of asserting to the contrary, contradicting" is from 1570s; that of "refusal to accept or acknowledge" is from 1580s. In some 19c. uses, it really means "self-denial." Meaning "unconscious suppression of painful or embarrassing feelings" first attested 1914 in A.A. Brill's translation of Freud's "Psychopathology of Everyday Life"; hence the phrase in denial, popularized 1980s.

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dismissal (n.)

"act of dismissing; state or fact of being dismissed," by 1795, formed on model of refusal, etc., from dismiss + -al (2); replacing earlier dismission (1540s); dismissing (late 15c.).

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naysayer (n.)

"one who refuses or denies," 1721, from verb naysay (implied from 1530s in naysaying); from nay + say (v.). The verbal phrase say (someone) no "refuse, deny" is from c. 1300. Nay-say (n.) "refusal" is from 1630s.

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