Etymology
Advertisement
redemption (n.)

mid-14c., redemcioun, "deliverance from sin," from Old French redemcion (12c.) and directly from Latin redemptionem (nominative redemptio) "a buying back or off, a releasing, a ransoming" (also "bribery"), noun of action from past-participle stem of redimere "to redeem, buy back," from red- "back" (see re-) + emere "to take, buy, gain, procure" (from PIE root *em- "to take, distribute").

The -d- is from the Old Latin habit of using red- as the form of re- before vowels, as also preserved in redact, redolent, redundant. The general sense of "release, repurchase, deliverance" is from late 15c. Commercial sense is from late 15c. Year of Redemption as "Anno Domini" is from 1510s. In the Mercian hymns, Latin redemptionem is glossed by Old English alesnisse.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Redemptorist (n.)

member of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (founded Naples, 1732, by St. Alphonsus Liguori), 1835 in English; see redemption. Noted for their missionary work among the poor. Fem. form is Redemptoristine.

Related entries & more 
redemptioner (n.)

"one who is or may be redeemed or set at liberty," specifically, in U.S. history, "indentured servant," 1775, from redemption + -er (1).

REDEMPTIONER. One who redeems himself or purchases his release from debt or obligation to the master of a ship by his services; or one whose services are sold to pay the expenses of his passage to America. [Webster, 1830]
Related entries & more 
redemptive (adj.)

"redeeming, serving to redeem," 1640s, from redempt (mid-15c.), adjective from Latin redemptus, past participle of redimere "to redeem, buy back" (see redemption) + -ive. Related: Redemptively. Other adjective forms were redemptory (1590s), redemptoric (1889); redemptorial (1823).

Related entries & more 
Irredentist (n.)
1882, member of Italian political party formed 1878 which demanded the annexation of neighboring regions where a part of the population was Italian-speaking (Trieste, South Tyrol, Nice, Corsica, etc.); from Italian Irredentista, from irredenta (Italia) "unredeemed (Italy)," fem. of irredento, from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + redento, from Latin redemptus, past participle of redimere (see redemption). Related: Irredentism.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ransom (n.)

13c., raunsoun, "sum paid for the release of a prisoner or captured man," also "redemption from damnation," from Old French ranson (Modern French rançon), earlier raenson "ransom, redemption," from Latin redemptionem (nominative redemptio) "a redeeming," from redimere "to redeem, buy back," from red- "back" (see re-) + emere "to take, buy, gain, procure" (from PIE root *em- "to take, distribute"). A doublet of redemption. A faded word somewhat revived by Scott early 19c. Spelling with -m appears by late 14c., but the reason for it is unclear (compare seldom, random).

Related entries & more 
universalism (n.)
1805 in theology, "the doctrine of universal salvation," from universal (adj.) + -ism. Universalist "one who, professing the Christian faith, believes in the eventual redemption of all humanity" is attested from 1620s.
Related entries & more 
redeemable (adj.)

"capable of being redeemed" in any sense; "admitting of redemption; capable of being paid off," 1610s, from redeem + -able. As a noun (redeemables) "redeemable property, etc.," by 1720.

Related entries & more 
infralapsarian (adj.)

1731, from infra- + Latin lapsus "a fall" (see lapse (n.)) + ending from unitarian, etc.

[In theology], the doctrine held by Augustinians and by many Calvinists, that God planned the creation, permitted the fall, elected a chosen number, planned their redemption, and suffered the remainder to be eternally punished. The Sublapsarians believe that God did not permit but foresaw the fall, while the Supralapsarians hold that God not only permitted but decreed it. [Century Dictionary]
Related entries & more 
bonus (n.)
"money or other benefit given as a premium or extra pay to reward or encourage work," 1773, "Stock Exchange Latin" [Weekley], meant as "a good thing," from Latin bonus "good" (adj.), perhaps originally "useful, efficient, working," from Proto-Italic *dw-eno- "good," probably a suffixed form of PIE root *deu- (2) "to do, perform; show favor." The correct noun form would be bonum. Specifically as "extra dividend paid to shareholders from surplus profits" from 1808. In U.S. history the bonus army was tens of thousands of World War I veterans and followers who marched on Washington, D.C., in 1932, at the height of the Great Depression, demanding early redemption of their service bonus certificates (which carried a maximum value of $625).
Related entries & more