Etymology
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really (adv.)

c. 1400, "actually, in fact, in a real manner," originally in reference to the presence of Christ in the Eucharist, "substantially," from real (adj.) + -ly (2). The general sense is from early 15c. Purely emphatic use dates from c. 1600, "indeed," sometimes as a corroboration, sometimes as an expression of surprise or a term of protest; interrogative use (as in oh, really?) is recorded from 1815.

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nominally (adv.)
1660s, "as regards a name," from nominal + -ly (2). Meaning "in name only" (as opposed to really) is attested from 1748.
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purely (adv.)

c. 1300, pureli, "wholly, fully, completely; actually, really, truly," from pure + -ly (2). Sense of "without physical admixture" is from c. 1500.

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etymon (n.)
"primitive word," 1570s, from Greek etymon, neuter of etymos "true, real, actual" (see etymology). Classical Greek used etymon as an adverb, "truly, really." Related: Etymic.
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apparently (adv.)
late 14c., "visibly, openly," from apparent + -ly (2). Meaning "evidently" is from 1550s; that of "to all appearances" (but not necessarily "really") is from 1560s; meaning "so far as can be judged" is from 1846.
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re-ally (v.)

"to form an alliance again, to connect or unite again," c. 1600, from re- + ally (v.). A doublet of rally (v.1), with hyphenated spelling and full pronunciation of the prefix to distinguish it from really. Related: Re-allied; re-alliance.

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rock (n.2)

1823, "action of rocking; a movement to and fro," from rock (v.1). As short for rock and roll, by 1957; but the sense of "musical rhythm characterized by a strong beat" is from 1946, in blues slang (Mezz Mezzrow, "Really the Blues"). Rock star is attested by 1966.

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di- (2)

word-forming element of Latin origin meaning "apart, asunder," the form of dis- before certain voiced consonants. As des- was a form of dis- in Old French, some Middle English words have forms in both de- and di-; compare devise, which really belongs to di- and is related to divide.

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misfortune (n.)

mid-15c., "unfortunate event or circumstance," from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + fortune. From c. 1500 as "adversity or ill fortune for which the sufferer is not directly responsible." In 19c., it was a euphemism for "illegitimate child." Related: Misfortunate.

Mischance is the lightest word for that which is really disagreeable; a mishap may be comparatively a trivial thing; both generally apply to the experience of individuals. Misfortune is the most general of these words; a misfortune is a really serious matter; it may befall a person, family, or nation. A very serious misfortune affecting large numbers is a calamity, the central idea of which is wide-spread and general mischief. [Century Dictionary, 1895]
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queueing (n.)

"act or fact of standing in line," 1918, verbal noun from queue (v.).

"Queueing" had really become an equivalent for sport with some working-class women. It afforded an occasion and an opportunity for gossip. ["The War of Food in Britain," in The Congregationalist and Advance, April 25, 1918]
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