Etymology
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realize (v.)

1610s, "bring into existence, make or cause to become real," also "exhibit the actual existence of," from French réaliser "make real" (16c.), from real "actual" (see real (adj.)). The sense of "understand clearly, comprehend the reality of" is recorded by 1775. Sense of "obtain, amass, bring or get into actual possession" (money, profit, etc.) is from 1753. Related: Realized; realizing.

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realizable (adj.)

"that may be realized" in any sense, 1847; see realize + -able.

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realization (n.)

1610s, "action of making real, a bringing or coming into existence;" see realize + -ation. Meaning "action of forming a clear concept, perception of the real existence of something" is from 1828. Related: Realizational.

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realise (v.)
chiefly British English spelling of realize; for suffix, see -ize. Related: Realisation; realised; realising.
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Lego 
1954, proprietary name (in use since 1934, according to the company), from Danish phrase leg godt "play well." The founder, Danish businessman Ole Kirk Christiansen (1891-1958), didn't realize until later that the word meant "I study" or "I put together" in Latin.
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technocracy (n.)

1919, coined by W.H. Smyth as a name for a new system of government by technical experts, from techno- + -cracy.

William Henry Smyth, a distinguished engineer of Berkeley, California, wrote at the close of the war a series of thoughtful papers for the New York magazine "Industrial Management", on the subject of "Technocracy". His thesis was the need of a Supreme National Council of Scientists to advise us how best to live, and how most efficiently to realize our individual aspirations and our national purpose. [The Bookman, March 1922]

There is an earlier use from 1895 in reference to the medical profession.

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orotund (adj.)

in elocution, "characterized by strength, fullness, richness, and clearness," 1792, from Latin ore rotundo "in well-rounded phrases," literally "with round mouth" (see ore rotundo).

The odd thing about the word is that its only currency, at least in its non-technical sense, is among those who should most abhor it, the people of sufficient education to realize its bad formation; it is at once a monstrosity in its form & a pedantry in its use. [Fowler]
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scent (v.)

late 14c., senten, originally a hunting term, "to find the scent of, perceive by smell," from Old French sentir "to feel, smell, touch, taste; realize, perceive; make love to," from Latin sentire " to feel, perceive by the senses; give one's opinion or sentiments" (see sense (n.)).

The unetymological -c- appeared 17c., perhaps in this case by influence of ascent, descent, etc., or by influence of science. But such an insertion was a pattern in early Modern English and also yielded scythe and for a time threatened to establish scite and scituate.

Figurative use from 1550s. The transitive sense "impregnate with an odor, make fragrant, perfume" is from 1690s. Related: Scented; scenting.

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mannerism (n.)

"excessive or monotonous use of distinctive methods in art or literature," 1803, from manner + -ism. Meaning "an instance of mannerism, habitual peculiarity in deportment, speech, or execution" is from 1819. Related: Mannerisms.

Perhaps few of those who write much escape from the temptation to trade on tricks of which they have learnt the effectiveness; & it is true that it is a delicate matter to discern where a peculiarity ceases to be an element in the individuality that readers associate pleasantly with the writer they like, & becomes a recurrent & looked-for & dreaded irritation. But at least it is well for every writer to realize that, for his as for other people's mannerisms, there is a point at which that transformation does take place. [Fowler]
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-ful 
word-forming element attached to nouns (and in modern English to verb stems) and meaning "full of, having, characterized by," also "amount or volume contained" (handful, bellyful); from Old English -full, -ful, which is full (adj.) become a suffix by being coalesced with a preceding noun, but originally a separate word. Cognate with German -voll, Old Norse -fullr, Danish -fuld. Most English -ful adjectives at one time or another had both passive ("full of x") and active ("causing x; full of occasion for x") senses.

It is rare in Old English and Middle English, where full was much more commonly attached at the head of a word (for example Old English fulbrecan "to violate," fulslean "to kill outright," fulripod "mature;" Middle English had ful-comen "attain (a state), realize (a truth)," ful-lasting "durability," ful-thriven "complete, perfect," etc.).
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