Etymology
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rap (n.)

early 14c., rappe, "a quick, light blow; a resounding stroke," also "a fart" (late 15c.), native or borrowed from a Scandinavian source (compare Danish rap, Swedish rapp "light blow"); either way probably of imitative origin (compare slap, clap).

Slang meaning "a rebuke, the blame, responsibility" is from 1777; specific meaning "criminal indictment" (as in rap sheet, 1960) is from 1903; to beat the rap is from 1927. Meaning "music with improvised words" was in New York City slang by 1979 (see rap (v.2)).

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rap (v.1)

mid-14c., rappen, "to strike, smite, knock," from rap (n.). Related: Rapped; rapping. To rap (someone's) knuckles "give sharp punishment" is from 1749 (to rap (someone's) fingers in the same sense is by 1670s.). Related: Rapped; rapping.

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rap (v.2)

intransitive, "talk informally, chat in an easy way," 1929, according to OED, popularized c. 1965 in African-American vernacular, possibly first in Caribbean English and from British slang rap (v.) "to say, utter" (by 1879), originally "to utter sharply, speak out" (1540s), ultimately a sense-branch of rap (v.1).

As a noun in this sense from 1898. Meaning "to perform rap music" is recorded by 1979. Related: Rapped; rapping.

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rapping (n.)

early 15c., "a knocking, colliding; production of sound by a rap," verbal noun from rap (v.1). Meaning "talking, chatting, conversation" is from 1969; meaning "rap music performance" is from 1979, both from rap (v.2).

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rapper (n.)

"one who or that which raps" in any sense, 1610s; see rap (v.)). It could mean "door-knocker" (1630s), "spirit-rapper" (1755), "professional perjurer" (1840), prison slang for "prosecutor" in prison slang (1904), "itinerant antiques buyer," with a tinge of shadiness (1914). The hip-hop performance sense emerged c. 1979. Rapster is from 1772.

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frap (v.)
"to strike, smite," early 14c., from Old French fraper "to strike, hit, beat," in nautical use "fix, fasten" (12c., Modern French frapper), cognate with Italian frappare "to strike," which is of unknown origin, perhaps imitative (compare rap (n.)). Nautical sense of "bind tightly" is from 1540s. Related: Frapped; frapping.
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rip-rap (n.)

also riprap, "loose stone thrown down in water or soft ground as foundation," 1822, American English, perhaps connected with earlier nautical word rip-rap meaning "stretch of rippling water" (often caused by underwater elevations), 1660s, which is perhaps of imitative origin (compare riprap "a sharp blow," 1570s). Also compare rip (n.2).

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rape (n.1)

early 14c., "booty, prey;" mid-14c., "forceful seizure, act of snatching by force; plundering, robbery, extortion," from Anglo-French rap, rape, and directly from Latin rapere "seize" (see rape (v.)). Meaning "act of abducting a woman or sexually violating her or both" is from early 15c. Late 13c. in Anglo-Latin (rapum).

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rapt (adj.)

late 14c., "carried away in an ecstatic trance," from Latin raptus, past participle of rapere "seize, carry off" (see rape (v.)). A figurative sense, the notion is of being "carried up into Heaven" (bodily or in a dream), as in a saint's vision.

The Latin literal sense of "carried away" also was in English from 1550s. Essentially an alternative past participle of rape, in 15c.-17c. the word also sometimes could mean "raped." The sense of "engrossed" is recorded from c. 1500.

As a Latin past-participle adjective, in English it spawned unthinking the back-formed verb rap "to affect with rapture," which was common c. 1600-1750. Before that, there was a verb rapt "seize or grasp, seize and carry off; ravish" (1570s), also "enrapture, transport as with ecstasy" (1590s). There also was a noun rapt in 15c. meaning both "rapture" and "rape."

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bling (n.)
also bling-bling, by 1997, U.S. rap slang, "wealth, expensive accessories," a sound suggestive of the glitter of jewels and precious metals (compare German blinken "to gleam, sparkle").
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