Etymology
Advertisement
railway (n.)

1812 in the modern sense, from rail (n.1) + way (n.). Also compare railroad (n.). Earlier used of any sort of road on which rails (originally wooden) were laid for easier transport (1776).

Rude railway-trains, with all your noise and smoke,
I love to see you wheresoe'er ye move :
Though Nature seems such trespass to reprove :
Though ye the soul of old romance provoke,
I thank you, that from misery ye unyoke
Thousands of panting horses.
[Richard Howitt, from "Railway Sonnets," Hood's Magazine, March 1845]

Railway time "standard time adopted throughout a railway system" is by 1847.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
railroad (n.)

1757, from rail (n.1) + road. Originally "road laid with rails for heavy wagons" in mining operations. The process itself (but not the word) seems to have been in use by late 17c. Application to passenger and freight trains dates from 1825, tending to be replaced in this sense in England by railway.

Related entries & more 
Amtrak 
U.S. government-run railway corporation, 1971, contraction of American Track.
Related entries & more 
timetable (n.)
1838, originally of railway trains, from time (n.) + table (n.).
Related entries & more 
monorail (n.)

"single-rail railway system," 1885, from French; a hybrid; see mono- + rail (n.1).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
SNCF 
French national railway, 1949, initialism (acronym) for Société Nationale des Chemins de Fer.
Related entries & more 
sideline (n.)
also side-line, "line on the side of a fish," 1768; "lines marking the limits of playing area" (on a football field, etc.), 1862, from side (adj.) + line (q.v.). Meaning "course of business aside from one's regular occupation" is from 1890. Railway sense is from 1890. The figurative sense of "position removed from active participation" is attested from 1934 (from the railway sense or from sports, because players who are not in the game stand along the sidelines). The verb meaning "put out of play" is from 1945. Related: Sidelined; sidelining.
Related entries & more 
model (adj.)

"serving as a model; worthy to serve as an exemplar," 1844, from model (n.). Model railway is by 1864.

Related entries & more 
non-stop (adj.)

also nonstop, "that does not stop," 1903, from non- + stop (n.); originally of railway trains not making intermediate stops. As an adverb by 1920.

Related entries & more 
shunt (n.)
1838, in railway use, from shunt (v.). By technicians in the sense of "electrical conductor" from 1863. Medical use dates from 1923.
Related entries & more