Etymology
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quick (adj.)

Middle English quik, from Old English cwic "living, alive, animate, characterized by the presence of life" (now archaic), and figuratively, of mental qualities, "rapid, ready," from Proto-Germanic *kwikwaz (source also of Old Saxon and Old Frisian quik, Old Norse kvikr "living, alive," Dutch kwik "lively, bright, sprightly," Old High German quec "lively," German keck "bold"), from PIE root *gwei- "to live." Sense of "lively, active, swift, speedy, hasty," developed by c. 1300, on notion of "full of life."

NE swift or the now more common fast may apply to rapid motion of any duration, while in quick (in accordance with its original sense of 'live, lively') there is a notion of 'sudden' or 'soon over.' We speak of a fast horse or runner in a race, a quick starter but not a quick horse. A somewhat similar feeling may distinguish NHG schnell and rasch or it may be more a matter of local preference. [Carl Darling Buck, "A Dictionary of Selected Synonyms in the Principal Indo-European Languages," 1949]

Of persons, "mentally active, prompt to perceive or respond to impressions" from late 15c. Of an action, process, etc., "done in little time," 1540s. Also in Middle English used of soft soils, gravel pits, etc. where the ground is shifting and yielding (mid-14c., compare quicksand). Also in Middle English "with child, in an advanced state of pregnancy" (when the woman can feel the child move within). Also formerly of bright flowers or colors (c. 1200).

As an adverb, "quickly, in a quick manner," from c. 1300. To be quick about something is from 1937. Quick buck is from 1946, American English. Quick-change artist (1886) originally was an actor expert in playing different roles in the same performance of a show. Quick-witted is from 1520s.

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quick (n.)

"living persons," Old English cwic, from quick (adj.). Frequently paired with the dead, from phrasing in the Nicene and Apostles' creeds, as in Middle English þan cwike and þa deaden, Old English cwicum & deadum. The quick "tender part of the flesh" (under a nail, etc.) is from late 14c. (quick (adj.) in the extended sense of "sensitive to pain" is from c. 1200); the figurative use of it, in touch (someone) to the quick is from 1520s.

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quick-march (n.)

"a quick-step, a march in quick time," 1752, from quick (adj.) + march (n.1).

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quick-step (n.)

1802, "step used in marching in quick-time" (110 steps per minute); by 1811 as "a march in quick-time," from quick (adj.) + step (n.). Also of music adapted to such a march. By 1880 as "a fast dance." From 1906 as a verb. Related: quick-stepped; quick-stepping.

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couch (n.2)

in couch-grass, 1570s; a corruption of Old English cwice "living, alive" (see quick (adj.)).

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quickness (n.)

c. 1200, quiknesse, "state of being alive," from quick (adj.) + -ness. Early 15c. as "alacrity, speed, rapidity;" mid-15c. as "readiness of perception, keenness of mind."

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quickset (adj.)

"formed of living plants," 1530s, from earlier noun, "a living plant set to grow for a hedge" (late 15c.), from quick (n.) "a live fence or hedge formed of some growing plant," especially hawthorn (mid-15c.); see quick (adj.) + set (v.).

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quickly (adv.)

mid-15c., quickli, "lively, vivid, lifelike," from quick (adj.) + -ly (2), and compare late Old English cwiculice "vigorously, keenly." Meaning "rapidly, in a short space of time" is from c. 1200.

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quickie (n.)

"anything made or done quickly," 1940, from quick (adj.) + -ie. As "alcoholic drink meant to be taken hurriedly," by 1941 (quick one in this sense from 1928). From 1926 as "motion picture made in a short time." By 1975 as "sex act done hastily."

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quickbeam (n.)

Old English cwic-beam, a name of some tree, from beam (n.), in its original sense of "tree," apparently with quick (adj.), though "the precise force of the adj. is not clear" [OED]. The aspen, old world mountain ash, and rowan have been proposed as the tree in question.

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