Etymology
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-one 

chemical suffix, from Greek -one, female patronymic (as in anemone, "daughter of the wind," from anemos); in chemical use denoting a "weaker" derivative. Its use in forming acetone (1830s) gave rise to the specialized chemical sense.

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-phobe 

word-forming element meaning "one who dreads, fears, or hates," from French -phobe, from Latin -phobus, from Greek -phobos "fearing," from phobos "fear, panic, flight," phobein "put to flight, frighten" (see phobia).

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-faction 

word-forming element making nouns of action from verbs, from Latin -factionem (nominative -factio), from facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

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-fic 

adjectival word-forming element meaning "making, creating," from French -fique and directly from Latin -ficus "making, doing," combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

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-ene 

hydrocarbon suffix, from Greek name-forming element -ene. It has no real meaning in itself; in chemistry terminology probably abstracted from methylene (1834). Put in systematic use by Hofmann (1865).

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-fuge 

word-forming element meaning "that which drives away or out," from Modern Latin -fugus, with sense from Latin fugare "to put to flight" (see febrifuge) but form from Latin fugere "to flee" (see fugitive (adj.)).

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centi- 

word-forming element meaning "one hundred" or "one hundredth part," used in English from c. 1800, from the French metric system, from Latin centi-, combining form of centum "one hundred" (see hundred).

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-path 

word-forming element used in modern formations to mean "one suffering from" (a disease or condition), from Greek pathos "suffering" (from PIE root *kwent(h)- "to suffer"). Also "one versed in" (a certain type of treatment), in which cases it is a back-formation from -pathy in the related sense.

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-ae 

occasional plural suffix of words ending in -a (see a- (1)), most of which, in English, are from Latin nominative fem. singular nouns (or Greek ones brought up through Latin), which in Latin form their plurals in -ae. But plurals in native -s were established early in English for many of them (such as idea, arena) and many have crossed over since. Purity now would only breed monsters.

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-mane 

word-forming element of French origin, "one who has a mania for," ultimately from Greek -manes "ardent admirer," related to mania "madness" (see mania).

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