Etymology
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go over (v.)

1580s, "review point by point;" see go (v.) + over (adv.). Meaning "be successful" is from 1923.

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get over (v.)

1680s, "overcome," from get (v.) + over (adv.). From 1712 as "recover from;" 1813 as "have done with."

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half seas over (adj.)

slang for "drunk," 1736, sometimes said to be from notion of a ship heavy-laden and so low in the water that small waves (half seas) wash over the deck. This suits the sense, but the phrase is not recorded in this alleged literal sense. Half seas over "halfway across the sea" is recorded from 1550s, however, and it was given a figurative extension to "halfway through a matter" by 1690s. What drunkenness is halfway to is not clear.

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head over heels (adv.)

1726, "a curious perversion" [Weekley] of Middle English heels over head (late 14c.) "somersault fashion," hence "recklessly." Head (n.) and heels long have been paired in alliterative phrases in English, and the whole image also was in classical Latin (per caput pedesque ire).

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coat of arms (n.)

mid-14c., also simply coat (mid-14c.); originally a tunic embroidered or painted with heraldic armorial bearings (worn over armor, etc); see coat (n.) + arm (n.2) and compare Old French cote a armer. Sense transferred in Middle English to the heraldic arms themselves. Hence turncoat, one who put his coat on inside-out to hide the badge of his loyalty (1550s).

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coup de grace (n.)

"a single blow or stroke, dispatching one condemned or mortally wounded to put an end to misery," 1690s, from French coup degrâce, literally "stroke of grace;" the merciful death-blow that ends another's suffering (see coup + grace (n.)).

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ab urbe condita 

with year-dates, an occasional Roman method of identifying a given year by reference to the time passed since founding of the city, which in 1c. B.C.E. was calculated to have taken place in what we would call 753 B.C.E. Literally "from the city founded;" the elements are ab "from" (see ab-) + ablative of urbs "city" (see urban) + fem. past participle of condere "put together, store," from assimilated form of com- "together" (see com-) + -dere "put" (from PIE root *dhe- "to put, place").

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roll-call (n.)

also roll call, rollcall, "act of calling over a list of names," 1775, probably from the verbal phrase (to call (over) the roll is attested by 1680s); see roll (n.1) "list of names used to determine who is present" (a sense attested from 1590s) + call (v.).

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in fieri 

legal Latin, "in the process of being done," from fieri "to come into being, become," used as passive of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

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get on (v.)

1590s, "to put on," from get (v.) + on (adv.). Meaning "prosper" is from 1785; that of "to advance, make progress" is from 1798; that of "be friendly" (with) is attested by 1816.

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