Etymology
pussy (n.1)

"cat," by 1690s, a diminutive of puss (n.1), also used of a rabbit (1715). As a term of endearment for a girl or woman, from 1580s (also used of effeminate men), and applied childishly to anything soft and furry. To play pussy was World War II RAF slang for "take advantage of cloud cover, jumping from cloud to cloud to shadow a potential victim or avoid recognition."

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pussy (n.2)

slang for "female pudenda," by 1879, but probably older; perhaps from Old Norse puss "pocket, pouch" (compare Low German puse "vulva"), or perhaps instead from the cat word (see pussy (n.1)) on the notion of "soft, warm, furry thing;" compare French le chat, which also has a double meaning, feline and genital. Earlier uses are difficult to distinguish from pussy (n.1), e.g.:

The word pussie is now used of a woman [Philip Stubbes, "The Anatomie of Abuses," 1583]

And songs such as "Puss in a Corner" (1690, attributed to D'Urfey) clearly play on the double sense of the word for ribald effect. But the absence of pussy in Grose and other early slang works argues against the vaginal sense being generally known before late 19c., as does its frequent use as a term of endearment in mainstream literature, as in:

"What do you think, pussy?" said her father to Eva. [Harriet Beecher Stowe, "Uncle Tom's Cabin," 1852]

Pussy-whipped "hen-pecked" is attested by 1956 (Middle English had cunt-beaten "impotent," in reference to a man, mid-15c.).

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pussy (adj.)

"full of pus," from pus (n.) + -y (2). In this sense Middle English had pushi (mid-15c.), from a variant of pus.

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pussy-cat (n.)

also pussycat, "a cat," 1773, pleonastic, from pussy (n.1) + cat (n.). Applied to persons by 1859.

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pussy-willow (n.)

popular name of a type of common American shrub or small tree, by 1835, a country or children's word, from pussy (n.1) + willow. So called for the small and very silky catkins it produces in early spring. Also sometimes pussy-cat (1850).

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wussy (n.)
1960s, probably an alteration of pussy (n.2). DAS suggests shortened from hypothetical pussy-wussy, reduplicated form of pussy (n.1).
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pussyfoot (v.)
also pussy-foot, 1903, "tread softly," from pussy (n.1) + foot (n.). As a noun from 1911, "a detective," American English, from the nickname of U.S. government Indian Affairs agent W.E. Johnson (1862-1945), in charge of suppressing liquor traffic on Indian reservations in Oklahoma, who was noted for his stealthy tactics. Related: Pussyfooting; pussy-footed (1893).
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wuss (n.)

1982, abbreviated from wussy.

Mike Damone: "You are a wuss: part wimp, and part pussy"
["Fast Times at Ridgemont High" script, 1982]
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runcible 

1871, a nonsense word coined by Edward Lear in "The Owl & the Pussy-Cat" (runcible spoon). The phrase runcible spoon has been used since 1926 for "spoon with three short tines like a fork," but OED writes that "the illustrations provided by himself for his books of verse give no warrant for this later interpretation."

As for Lear's inspiration for the word, suspicion falls on runcival, a contemporary variant of the old word rounceval "something big and loud," which is said to be from Roncevaux (French Rouncesvalles), the pass in the Pyrenees where Roland fell in battle.

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