Etymology
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purple (n., adj.)

Middle English purpel, from Old English purpul, a dissimilation (first recorded in Northumbrian, in the Lindisfarne gospel) of purpure "purple dye, a purple garment," purpuren (adj.) "purple; dyed or colored purple," a borrowing by 9c. from Latin purpura "purple color, purple-dyed cloak, purple dye," also "shellfish from which purple was made," and "splendid attire generally." This is from Greek porphyra "purple dye, purple" (compare porphyry), a word of uncertain origin, perhaps Semitic, originally the name for the shellfish (murex) from which it was obtained. Purpur continued as a parallel form until 15c., and through 19c. in heraldry.

Attested from early 15c. as the name of the color formed by the mixture of blue and red (later from nearly violet-blue to not quite crimson; in the Middle Ages also applied to darker, richer reds). Tyrian purple (properly a crimson), produced around Tyre, was prized as dye for royal garments, hence the figurative use of purple for "imperial or regal power," by 1550s. Also the color of mourning or penitence (especially in royalty or clergy).

Rhetorical use in reference to "splendid, gaudy" (since mid-18c. typically of prose) is from 1590s. In U.S. politics, indicating an alternative to the increasing division of the country into red (Republican) and blue (Democratic), by 2004.

Purple Heart, the U.S. decoration for service members wounded in combat, was instituted 1932; originally it was a cloth decoration begun by George Washington in 1782. Hendrix' Purple Haze (1967) is slang for "LSD." Purple death "cheap Italian red wine" is by 1947. Purple finch, the common North American bird, was so called by 1760 in catalogues; "the name is a misnomer, arising from the faulty coloring of a plate by Mark Catesby, 1731" [Century Dictionary]. It also is called house finch, for its domesticity. Purple martin is from 1743. 

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purple (v.)

c. 1400, "to tinge or stain with purple," from purple (n.); purpured, a past-participle adjective from the earlier form of the word, is attested late 14c. Related: Purpled; purpling.

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purplish (adj.)

"somewhat purple," 1560s, from purple (n.) + -ish.

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purpurescent (adj.)

"purplish, tinged with purple," 1890, in zoology, from Latin purpura (see purple (n.)) + -escent. The Latin adjective was purparescent, present participle of purpurascere "to become purple," from purpurare.

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purpura (n.)

disease characterized by eruptions of purple patches on the skin, 1753, from Modern Latin, from Latin purpura "purple dye" (see purple (n.)). Related: Purpuric.

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porphyria (n.)

metabolic disorder, 1923, from porphyrin (1910), the name of the type of chemical which, in imbalance, causes it, from German porphyrin (1909), chemical name, from Greek porphyros "purple" (see purple) + -in (2). Some of the compounds are purple.

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porphyry (n.)

type of very hard stone made of crystals embedded in a homogeneous base, late 14c., porfurie, from Old French porfire, pourfire, from Italian porfiro and in some cases directly from Latin porphyrites, name given by the Romans to a purple stone used extensively for ornamental purposes and quarried near the Red Sea in Egypt, from Greek porphyrites (lithos) "the purple (stone)," from porphyra (n.) "purple, purple dye" (see purple). Spelling Latinized mid-15c. Now used generally for a type of igneous rock without regard to color. Porphyrios was an ancient proper name.

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murex (n.)

kind of shellfish which yields a purple dye, 1580s, from Latin murex (plural murices) "purple fish, purple dye," probably cognate with Greek myax "sea mussel," a word of unknown origin, perhaps related to mys "mouse" (see muscle (n.) and mussel).

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mauve (n.)

reddish-purple aniline dye, 1859, from French mauve, from Old French mauve "mallow" (13c.), from Latin malva "mallow" (see mallow). The dye was so called from its resemblance to the purple markings of the petals of the mallow plant. Related: Mauvish.

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amaranthine (adj.)
1660s, "unfading, undying," poetic (apparently coined by Milton), also amarantine; see amaranth, name of a mythical unfading flower + -ine (1). From late 19c. of a purple color similar to that of the flowers of the ornamental plant so-called.
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