Etymology
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pup (n.)

1760, "young dog," shortened form of puppy (q.v.). Used earlier (from 1580s) for "conceited person," from the figurative sense of puppy. An English-Latin wordbook from late 15c. for Latin pupa gives English pup-bairn. Applied to the young of the fur seal from 1815. Used for "inexperienced person" by 1890.

Pup tent (also dog tent) as a type of small tent used in the military is from 1863. Sopwith pup, popular name of the Sopwith Scout Tractor airplane, is from 1917.

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pupil (n.1)

[student], late 14c., "orphan child, ward, person under the care of a guardian," from Old French pupille (14c.) and directly from Latin pupillus (fem. pupilla) "orphan child, ward, minor," diminutive of pupus "boy" (fem. pupa "girl"), probably related to puer "child" (and thus probably from a suffixed form of PIE root *pau- (1) "few, little").

Meaning "disciple, student youth or any person of either sex under the care of an instructor or tutor" is recorded by 1560s. Related: Pupillary; pupillarity; pupillage.

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puppyish (adj.)

"of the nature or character of a puppy," 1775, from puppy + -ish. Related: Puppyishness.

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pupation (n.)

"act of pupating; state of being a pupa," 1837, noun of action; see pupate (v.).

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Puppis 

a subdivision of the ancient constellation Argo, which was broken into three divisions from late 18c., from Latin puppis "a ship, the stern of a ship," a word of uncertain origin (compare poop (n.1)).

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pupa (n.)

"post-larval stage of a metamorphosizing insect," 1773, a special use by Linnæus (1758) of Latin pupa "girl, doll, puppet" (see pupil (n.1)) on notion of "undeveloped creature." Related: Pupal; pupiform.

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pupil (n.2)

"center of the eye, orifice of the iris," early 15c. pupille (the word is in English in Latin form from late 14c.), from Old French pupille (14c.) and directly from Latin pupilla, originally "little girl-doll," diminutive of pupa "girl; doll" (see pupil (n.1)).

The eye region was so called from the tiny image one sees of oneself reflected in the eye of another. Greek used a single word, korē (literally "girl;" see Kore), to mean both "doll" and "pupil of the eye;" and compare obsolete English baby "small image of oneself in another's pupil" (1590s), source of 17c. colloquial expression to look babies "stare lovingly into another's eyes."

Self-knowledge can be obtained only by looking into the mind and virtue of the soul, which is the diviner part of a man, as we see our own image in another's eye. [Plato, Alcibiades, I.133]
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puppet (n.)

1530s, "doll or little figure of a person moved by strings or wires" (later applied to puppets in glove form), a later form of Middle English popet "doll" (c. 1300; compare poppet), from Old French popette "little doll, puppet," diminutive of popee "doll, puppet" (13c., Modern French poupée), from Vulgar Latin *puppa, from Latin pupa "girl; doll" (see pupil (n.1)).

The metaphoric extension to "one actuated by the will of another, one whose actions are manipulated by another" is recorded from 1540s (as poppet). Puppet show "dramatic performance with puppets" is attested from 1650s, earlier puppet-play (1550s). Puppet government, one managed by the will of another power, is attested from 1884 (in reference to Egypt). Puppet-master "manager of a puppet-show" is by 1630s.

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pupate (v.)

"become a pupa, undergo transformation from a grub or larva to that of a perfect insect," 1862, from pupa + -ate (2). Related: Pupated; pupating.

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puppy (n.)

late 15c., "woman's small pet dog," a word of uncertain origin but likely to be from French poupée "doll, toy" (see puppet). "A little dog appears to have been called puppy because petted as a doll or puppet" [Century Dictionary].

The meaning shifted from "toy dog" to "young dog" (1590s), replacing native whelp. In early use in English the words puppet and puppy were not always distinguished. The word also was used from about that time in the contemptuous sense of "vain or silly young man."

Puppy-dog is attested by 1590s (in Shakespeare, puppi-dogges). Puppy love "juvenile infatuation" is from 1823. Puppy fat "excessive fat on a child or adolescent" is by 1913 (in reference to young dogs by 1894).

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