Etymology
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psych (v.)

by 1914 as "to subject to psychoanalysis," short for psychoanalyze. From 1934 as "to outsmart" (also psych out), and by 1952 in bridge as "make a bid meant to deceive an opponent." From 1963 as "to unnerve." However to psych (oneself) up is from 1972; to be psyched up "stimulate (oneself), prepare mentally for a special effort" is attested from 1968.

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psych (n.)

short for psychology in various senses; e.g. as an academic study, in student slang by 1895.

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psychoanalysis (n.)

"the theory or therapy of treating mental disorders by investigating unconscious elements and bringing repressed fears and conflicts to the patient's awareness," from Psychoanalyse, coined 1896 in French by Freud from Latinized form of Greek psykhē "the soul, mind, spirit; understanding" (see psyche) + German Analyse, from Greek analysis (see analysis). Freud earlier used psychische analyse (1894).

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psychosis (n.)

1847, "mental affection or derangement," Modern Latin, from Greek psykhē "mind, life, soul" (see psyche) + -osis "abnormal condition." Greek psykhosis meant "a giving of life; animation; principle of life."

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psychodynamic (adj.)

also psycho-dynamic, 1856, in homeopathic publications, "pertaining to mental powers" (mesmerism, etc.), from psycho- + dynamic (adj.). By 1874 as "pertaining to psychodynamics," the science of the laws of mental action (George Henry Lewes).

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psychologist (n.)

"one who studies, writes on, or is versed in psychology," 1727; see psychology + -ist.

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psychometrics (n.)

"the science of measuring mental capacities and processes," 1917, from psychometry; also see -ics.

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psychotherapy (n.)

"art of curing mental diseases," 1892, from psycho- + therapy, on model of French psychothérapie (1889). In early use also of treatment of diseases by "psychic" methods (mainly hypnotism). Psychotherapeia was used in medical writing in 1853 as "remedial influence of the mind." Related: Psychotherapeutic (1890, in reference to hypnotic treatment); psychotherapeutics (1872).

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psychiatrist (n.)

"one who practices psychiatry," 1875, from psychiatry + -ist.

A psychiatrist is a man who goes to the Folies Bergère and looks at the audience. [Anglican Bishop Mervyn Stockwood, 1961]

An older name was mad-doctor (1703); also psychiater "expert in mental diseases" (1852), from Greek psykhē + iatros. Also see alienist.

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psychoanalyst (n.)

also psycho-analyst, "one who practices or has training in psychoanalysis," 1910; see psychoanalysis.

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