Etymology
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pseudo (n.)

late 14c., "false or spurious thing," especially "person falsely claiming divine authority," from Medieval Latin; see pseudo-. In modern use, of things, "imitated and exaggerated;" of persons, "pretentious, insincere," from 1945; as a noun in the modern sense from 1959. Related: Pseudish.

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pseudo-scientific (adj.)

also pseudoscientific, "of the nature of or characteristic of a pseudo-science," 1816; see pseudo- + scientific; also compare pseudo-science.

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pseudo-science (n.)

also pseudoscience, "a pretended or mistaken science," 1796 (the earliest reference is to alchemy), from pseudo- + science.

The term pseudo-science is hybrid, and therefore objectionable. Pseudognosy would be better etymology, but the unlearned might be apt to association with it the idea of a dog's nose, and thus, instead of taking "the eel of science by the tail," take the cur of science by the snout; so that all things considered we had better adopt the current term pseudo-sciences ["The Pseudo-Sciences," in The St. James's Magazine, January 1842]
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pseudocide (n.)

"pretended suicide attempt," 1959, from pseudo- + ending abstracted from suicide. Related: Pseudocidal.

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pseudomorph (n.)

"irregular form," especially in mineralogy, 1838, earlier in German and French, from pseudo- "false, deceptive" + Greek morphē "form," a word of uncertain etymology. Related: Pseudomorphic.

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pseudo- 

often before vowels pseud-, word-forming element meaning "false; feigned; erroneous; in appearance only; resembling," from Greek pseudo-, combining form of pseudēs "false, lying; falsely; deceived," or pseudos "falsehood, untruth, a lie," both from pseudein "to tell a lie; be wrong, break (an oath)," also, in Attic, "to deceive, cheat, be false," but often regardless of intention, a word of uncertain origin. Words in Slavic and Armenian have been compared; by some scholars the Greek word is connected with *psu- "wind" (= "nonsense, idle talk"); Beekes suggests Pre-Greek origin.

Productive in compound formation in ancient Greek (such as pseudodidaskalos "false teacher," pseudokyon "a sham cynic," pseudologia "a false speech," pseudoparthenos "pretended virgin"), it began to be used with native words in later Middle English with a sense of "false, hypocritical" (pseudoclerk "deceitful clerk;" pseudocrist "false apostle;" pseudoprest "heretical priest;" pseudoprophete; pseudofrere) and has been productive since then; the list of words in it in the OED print edition runs to 13 pages. In science, indicating something deceptive in appearance or function.

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pseudopod (n.)

type of protozoa, 1862, from Modern Latin pseudopodium (itself in English from 1854), from pseudo- + Latinized form of Greek podion, diminutive of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). Related: Pseudopodal.

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pseudograph (n.)

"writing falsely ascribed to someone," 1828 (in German from 1809), from Late Latin pseudographus, from Greek pseudographos "writer of falsehoods," from pseudo- (see pseudo-) + graphos "(something) drawn or written" (see -graphy). Pseudography was in English from 1570s with a sense of "bad spelling; incorrect system or method of graphic representation."

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pseudodox (n.)

"false but common opinion, a vulgar error," 1610s, from Greek pseudodoxos "holding a false opinion," from pseudes "false" (see pseudo-) + doxa "opinion" (from dokein "to seem;" from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept"). Related: Pseudodoxal.

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pseudepigrapha (n.)

"books or writings of false authorship," 1620s (implied in pseudepigraphical), especially of spurious writing professing to be Biblical in character and inspired in authorship, from Modern Latin use of Greek neuter plural of pseudepigraphos "with false title," from pseudos "a lie" (see pseudo-) + epigraphē "a writing" (see epigraph).

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