Etymology
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prudent (adj.)

late 14c., "wise, discerning, judicious," from Old French prudent "with knowledge, deliberate" (c. 1300) and directly from Latin prudentem (nominative prudens) "knowing, skilled, sagacious, circumspect;" rarely in literal sense "foreseeing;" contraction of providens, present participle of providere "look ahead, prepare, supply, act with foresight," from pro "ahead" (see pro-) + videre "to see" (from PIE root *weid- "to see").

The sense gradually grew to emphasize the notions of "discreet, circumspect; careful of self-interest." As a noun, "wise ones, skillful ones," late 14c. Related: Prudently.

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*weid- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to see."

It forms all or part of: advice; advise; belvedere; clairvoyant; deja vu; Druid; eidetic; eidolon; envy; evident; guide; guidon; guise; guy (n.1) "small rope, chain, wire;" Gwendolyn; Hades; history; idea; ideo-; idol; idyll; improvisation; improvise; interview; invidious; kaleidoscope; -oid; penguin; polyhistor; prevision; provide; providence; prudent; purvey; purview; review; revise; Rig Veda; story (n.1) "connected account or narration of some happening;" supervise; survey; twit; unwitting; Veda; vide; view; visa; visage; vision; visit; visor; vista; voyeur; wise (adj.) "learned, sagacious, cunning;" wise (n.) "way of proceeding, manner;" wisdom; wiseacre; wit (n.) "mental capacity;" wit (v.) "to know;" witenagemot; witting; wot.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit veda "I know;" Avestan vaeda "I know;" Greek oida, Doric woida "I know," idein "to see;" Old Irish fis "vision," find "white," i.e. "clearly seen," fiuss "knowledge;" Welsh gwyn, Gaulish vindos, Breton gwenn "white;" Gothic, Old Swedish, Old English witan "to know;" Gothic weitan "to see;" English wise, German wissen "to know;" Lithuanian vysti "to see;" Bulgarian vidya "I see;" Polish widzieć "to see," wiedzieć "to know;" Russian videt' "to see," vest' "news," Old Russian vedat' "to know."
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judicious (adj.)

c. 1600, "having sound judgment; careful, prudent," also "manifesting sound judgment, carefully planned," from French judicieux (16c.) or directly from Medieval Latin iudiciosus "prudent, judicious," from Latin iudicium "judgment," from iudicem "a judge" (see judge (n.)). Related: Judiciously; judiciousness.

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provident (adj.)

c. 1400, "prudent, foreseeing wants and making provision to supply them," from Old French provident and directly from Latin providentem (nominative providens) "foreseeing, prudent," present participle of providere "to foresee" (see provide). By 1590s as "frugal, economical."

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advisable (adj.)
1640s, "prudent, expedient," from advise (v.) + -able (q.v.). It also can mean "open to advice" (1660s), but this is rare.
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sophrosyne (n.)
the quality of wise moderation; Greek, "prudence, moderation in desires, discretion, temperance," from sophron "of sound mind, prudent, temperate" (see Sophronia).
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well-done (adj.)
c. 1200, "wise, prudent," from well (adv.) + done. Meaning "thoroughly cooked," in reference to meat, is attested from 1747. Well done! as an exclamation of approval is recorded from mid-15c.
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thoughtful (adj.)
c. 1200, "contemplative, occupied with thought," from thought + -ful. Also in Middle English, "prudent; moody, anxious." Meaning "showing consideration for others" is from 1851 (compare thoughtless.) Related: Thoughtfully; thoughtfulness.
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Sophronia 

fem. proper name, from Greek sōphrōnia, from sōphrōn (genitive sōphrōnos) "discreet, prudent, sensible, having control over sensual desires, moderate, chaste," literally "of sound mind," from sōs "safe, sound, whole" + phrēn "heart, mind" (see phreno-).

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considerate (adj.)

1570s, "marked by deliberation," from Latin consideratus, past participle of considerare "to look at closely, observe" (see consider). Of persons, "deliberate, prudent, given to consideration" 1580s; meaning "not unfeeling or rigorous, showing consideration for the circumstances or feelings of others" is from c. 1700. Related: Considerately; considerateness.

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