Etymology
Advertisement
provision (n.)

late 14c., provisioun, "foresight, prudence, care;" also "a providing beforehand, action of arranging in advance" (at first often in reference to ecclesiastical appointments made before the position was vacant), from Old French provision "precaution, care" (early 14c.), from Latin provisionem (nominative provisio) "a foreseeing, foresight, preparation, prevention," noun of action from past-participle stem of providere "look ahead" (see provide).

The meaning "something provided, supply of necessary things" is attested from mid-15c.; specific sense of "supply of food" (provisions) is by c. 1600. In law, "a stipulation, a distinct clause in a statute, etc.; a rule or principle," late 15c. A provision-car (by 1864) was a railroad car with refrigeration for preserving perishable products during transportation.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
provision (v.)

"to supply with things necessary," especially a store of food, 1787, from provision (n.). Related: Provisioned; provisioning.

Related entries & more 
improvision (n.)
"want of forethought," 1640s, from assimilated form of in- (1) "not, opposite of" + provision.
Related entries & more 
provisioner (n.)

"one who furnishes provisions or supplies," 1814, agent noun from provision (v.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
provisional (adj.)

"as a temporary arrangement, provided for present need or occasion," c. 1600, from provision (n.) + -al (1), or else from French provisionnal (15c.), from provision. The notion is of something that will "provide for present needs." Related: Provisionally.

Related entries & more 
wharfinger (n.)
"operator or manager of a wharf," 1550s, from wharfage "provision or accommodation at wharves" (mid-15c.), from wharf + agent noun suffix -er (1) + unetymological -n- as in messenger.
Related entries & more 
chop-house (n.)
1680s, "a mean house of entertainment, where provision ready dressed is sold" [Johnson], from chop (n.) in the "meat" sense + house (n.).
Related entries & more 
denture (n.)

"the provision of teeth in the jaws," especially "a set of artificial teeth," 1845, from French denture "set of teeth," from Latin dens (genitive dentis, "tooth," from PIE root *dent- "tooth") + -ure (see -ure). In Middle English, the word meant "an indenture; a zigzag course" (c. 1400). Related: Dentures.

Related entries & more 
provident (adj.)

c. 1400, "prudent, foreseeing wants and making provision to supply them," from Old French provident and directly from Latin providentem (nominative providens) "foreseeing, prudent," present participle of providere "to foresee" (see provide). By 1590s as "frugal, economical."

Related entries & more