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pronounce (v.)

mid-14c., pronouncen, "to declare officially, proclaim, announce;" late 14c., "to speak, utter" (words, a language, etc.), "form or articulate with the organs of speech," from Old French prononcier "declare, speak out, pronounce" (late 13c., Modern French prononcer) and directly from Late Latin pronunciare, from Latin pronuntiare "to proclaim, announce; pronounce, utter," from pro "forth, out, in public" (see pro-) + nuntiare "announce," from nuntius "messenger" (from PIE root *neu- "to shout").

With reference to the mode of sounding words or languages, it is attested by 1610s (pronunciation in the related sense is attested from early 15c.). Meaning "make a statement," especially authoritative one (as in pronounce judgment) is from early 15c. Related: Pronounced; pronouncing.

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pronounceable (adj.)

"capable of being pronounced or uttered," 1610s, from pronounce (v.) + -able.

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pronouncement (n.)

"act of pronouncing; a proclamation or formal announcement," 1590s, from pronounce + -ment.

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pronounced (adj.)

1570s, "spoken," past-participle adjective from pronounce (v.). Figurative sense of "emphatic, strongly marked or defined" is attested by 1741. Related: Pronouncedly.

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mispronounce (v.)

"pronounce erroneously or incorrectly," 1590s, from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + pronounce. Related: Mispronounced; mispronouncing.

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pronunciation (n.)

early 15c., pronunciacioun, "mode in which a word is pronounced," from Old French prononciacion (13c.) and directly from Latin pronuntiationem (nominative pronuntiatio) "act of speaking, utterance, delivery," also "proclamation, public declaration," noun of action from past-participle stem of pronuntiare "announce" (see pronounce). The -t- was restored in the English word 16c.

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*neu- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to shout." It forms all or part of: announce; denounce; enunciate; nuncio; pronounce; renounce.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek neuo "to nod, beckon," Latin nuntius "messenger," Old Irish noid "make known."
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judge (v.)
c. 1200, iugen, "examine, appraise, make a diagnosis;" c. 1300, "to form an opinion about; inflict penalty upon, punish; try (someone) and pronounce sentence," also intransitive, "make a decision, decide, think, suppose;" from Anglo-French juger, Old French jugier "to judge, pronounce judgment; pass an opinion on" (10c., Modern French juger), from Latin iudicare "to judge, to examine officially; form an opinion upon; pronounce judgment," from iudicem (nominative iudex) "a judge," a compound of ius "right, law" (see just (adj.)) + root of dicere "to say" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly").

Related: Judged; judging. Spelling with -dg- emerged mid-15c. The Old English word was deman (see doom (n.)). The Latin word also is the source of Spanish juzgar, Italian giudicare.
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lip (v.)
c. 1600, "to kiss," from lip (n.). Meaning "to pronounce with the lips only" is from 1789. Related: Lipped; lipping.
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emphasize (v.)

"to utter or pronounce with emphasis, lay stress upon; bring out clearly or distinctly," 1765, from emphasis + -ize. Related: Emphasized; emphasizing.

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