Etymology
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profitable (adj.)

c. 1300, "yielding spiritual or moral benefit, useful," from profit (v.) + -able or from Old French profitable, porfitable. From mid-14c. as "advantageous, expedient, helpful." Specific sense of "money-making" is attested from 1758. Related: Profitably; profitableness.

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unprofitable (adj.)
early 14c., from un- (1) "not" + profitable (adj.). Related: Unprofitably.
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profitability (n.)

mid-14c., profitabilite, "usefulness, use," from profitable + -ity or from Old French profitablete. Sense of "quality of being profitable, gainfulness" is by 1890.

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lucrative (adj.)

"yielding gain, highly profitable," early 15c., from Old French lucratif "profitable" and directly from Latin lucrativus "gainful, profitable," from lucratus, past participle of lucrari "to gain, win, acquire," from lucrum "gain, profit" (see lucre). Related: Lucratively; lucrativeness.

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utile (adj.)
late 15c., from Old French utile "useful" (13c.), from Latin utilis "useful, beneficial, profitable," from uti "make use of, profit by, take advantage of" (see use (v.)).
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remunerative (adj.)

1620s, "inclined to remunerate" (a sense now obsolete), from remunerate + -ive. From 1670s as "that remunerates, rewarding;" by 1859 specifically as "profitable, yielding a sufficient return." Related: Remuneratively; remunerativeness. An earlier adjective was remuneratory (1580s).

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money-maker (n.)

late 13c, "one who coins money," from money + maker. Sense of "one who accumulates money" is by 1864; meaning "thing which yields profit" is from 1899. To make money "earn pay" is attested from mid-15c. Money-making (adj.) "lucrative, profitable" is from 1862.

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prosit (interj.)

1846, toast or expression wishing good health (from 16c., famously a drinking pledge by German students), Latin, literally "may it advantage (you)," third person singular present subjunctive of prodesse "to do good, be profitable" (see proud (adj.)).

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inutility (n.)

"quality of being useless or unprofitable," 1590s, from French inutilité (15c.), from Latin inutilitas "uselessness," from inutilis "useless, unprofitable," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + utilis "useful, beneficial, profitable," from uti "make use of, profit by, take advantage of" (see use (v.)).

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payoff (n.)

also pay-off, by 1905, "winnings from gambling," from pay (v.) + off (adv.). Meaning "graft, bribes" is attested by 1930. The verbal phrase pay off is by 1710 in the sense of "pay in full and discharge" (workers); by 1937 as "be profitable, succeed."

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