Etymology
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professional (adj.)

mid-15c., profeshinalle, in reference to the profession of religious orders; see profession. By 1747 of careers, "pertaining to or appropriate to a profession or calling" (especially of the skilled or learned trades from c. 1793);  In sports and amusements, "undertaken or engaged in for money" (opposed to amateur), by 1846. Related: Professionally.

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professional (n.)

"a professional person, one who follows a trade or occupation in a professional way," 1798, from professional (adj.).

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semi-professional (adj.)

also semiprofessional, 1824, in reference to one who is paid for an occupation or activity but does not rely on it for sustenance, from semi- + professional (adj.). As a noun from 1843. Related: Semi-professionally.

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professionalize (v.)

1833, transitive, "to render professional;" 1890, intransitive, "to become professional;" from professional (adj.) + -ize. Related: Professionalized; professionalizing.

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professionalism (n.)

1846, "characteristic ideas or methods of professional persons," from professional (adj.) + -ism. In late 19c., in sports and amusements, sometimes with a negative sense, implying pursuit of some activity so marked as to be objectionable or offensive (1879).

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paraprofessional (adj.)

of persons, "performing part of a professional task but not having professional training or credentials," by 1961 in education, from para- (1) + professional (adj.). As a noun, "person without professional credentials or training to whom a part of a professional task is delegated," by 1968.

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pro (n.1)

1866 as a shortening of professional (n.). The adjective is attested by 1915 (in golfing's pro shop, workshop run by the resident professional at a club). The use of professional in reference to prostitutes seems to have accounted for proette in sports writing for "female pro golfer" (1968).

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*bha- (2)

*bhā-; Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to speak, tell, say."

It forms all or part of: abandon; affable; anthem; antiphon; aphasia; aphonia; aphonic; apophasis; apophatic; ban (n.1) "proclamation or edict;" ban (v.); banal; bandit; banish; banlieue; banns (n.); bifarious; blame; blaspheme; blasphemy; boon (n.); cacophony; confess; contraband; defame; dysphemism; euphemism; euphony; fable; fabulous; fado; fairy; fame; famous; fandango; fatal; fate; fateful; fatuous; fay; gramophone; heterophemy; homophone; ineffable; infamous; infamy; infant; infantile; infantry; mauvais; megaphone; microphone; monophonic; nefandous; nefarious; phatic; -phone; phone (n.2) "elementary sound of a spoken language;" phoneme; phonetic; phonic; phonics; phono-; pheme; -phemia; Polyphemus; polyphony; preface; profess; profession; professional; professor; prophecy; prophet; prophetic; quadraphonic; symphony; telephone; xylophone.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek pheme "speech, voice, utterance, a speaking, talk," phōnē "voice, sound" of a human or animal, also "tone, voice, pronunciation, speech," phanai "to speak;" Sanskrit bhanati "speaks;" Latin fari "to say," fabula "narrative, account, tale, story," fama "talk, rumor, report; reputation, public opinion; renown, reputation;" Armenian ban, bay "word, term;" Old Church Slavonic bajati "to talk, tell;" Old English boian "to boast," ben "prayer, request;" Old Irish bann "law."

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