Etymology
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procrastination (n.)

"a putting off to a future time; dilatoriness," 1540s, from French procrastination (16c.) and directly from Latin procrastinationem (nominative procrastinatio) "a putting off from day to day," noun of action from past-participle stem of procrastinare "put off till tomorrow, defer, delay," from pro "forward" (see pro-) + crastinus "belonging to tomorrow," from cras "tomorrow," a word of unknown origin.

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procrastinate (v.)

"to put off till another day, defer to a future time," 1580s, a back formation from procrastination or else from Latin procrastinatus, past participle of procrastinare "to put off till tomorrow; defer, delay." Intransitive sense of "be dilatory" is by 1630s. Related: Procrastinated; procrastinating. The earlier verb was procrastine (1540s), from French procrastiner.

Do not put off till tomorrow what can be put off till day-after-tomorrow just as well. ["Mark Twain," "Advice to Young People," 1882]
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dwelling (n.)

"place of residence, habitation, abode," mid-14c., verbal noun from dwell (v.). Earlier it meant "a stupor" (early 14c.); "delay, procrastination; a staying in a place" (c. 1300).

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manana 

from Spanish mañana, "tomorrow," from cras manñana, literally "tomorrow early," from Vulgar Latin *maneana "early," from Latin mane "in the morning," from PIE *ma- "good," with notion of "occurring at a good time, timely, early" (compare matins; and see mature (v.)). "Often taken as a synonym of easy-going procrastination said to be found in Spanish-speaking countries" [OED].

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anon (adv.)

late Old English anon "straightway, forthwith," earlier on an, literally "into one," thus "continuously; straightway (in one course), at once;" see one. As a reply, "at once, coming!" By gradual misuse, "soon, in a little while" (1520s). An etymological one-word lesson in procrastination.

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dilatory (adj.)
Origin and meaning of dilatory

mid-15c., dilatorie, "marked by or given to procrastination or delay, not prompt," from Old French dilatorie and directly from Late Latin dilatorius, from dilator "procrastinator," from dilatus, serving as past participle of differe "to delay, put off, postpone," from assimilated form of dis- "away from" (see dis-) + ferre "to bear, carry," from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry." Meaning "intending to cause delay" is from 1530s. Related: Dilatorily; dilatoriness.

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