Etymology
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pregnancy (n.)

"state of a female who has conceived or is with child," 1520s (originally figurative), from pregnant (adj.1) + abstract noun suffix -cy. Literal use attested from 1590s. An earlier word in this sense was pregnacioun (early 15c.), from Old French pregnacion and Latin praegnationem.

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prednisone (n.)

synthetic steroid, 1955, probably with ending from cortisone + elements of pregnadiene, from pregnane, name of the compound from which pregnancy hormones were derived, from the Latin stem of pregnancy, + diene "unsaturated hydrocarbon containing two double bonds between carbon atoms," from di- + -ene.

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pre-eclampsia (n.)

also preeclampsia, "pregnancy condition characterized by high blood pressure and other symptoms associated with eclampsia," 1903, from pre- + eclampsia. Related: Pre-eclamptic (1896).

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Braxton Hicks 

in reference to uterine contractions in pregnancy, 1905, from the name of English obstetrician John Braxton Hicks, who described them in 1872.

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preterm (adj.)

also pre-term, "born or occurring after a pregnancy that lasted much less than the usual term," 1928, from pre- "before" + term (n.).

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obstetrics (n.)

"science of midwifery, the department of medicine which deals with the treatment and care of women during pregnancy and childbirth," 1819, from obstetric (adj.); also see -ics.

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gravid (adj.)

"pregnant," 1590s, from Latin gravidus "loaded, full, swollen; pregnant with child," from gravis "burdened, heavy," from PIE root *gwere- (1) "heavy." Related: Gravidity. Gravidation "pregnancy" is attested from mid-15c.

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ectopic (adj.)

1864 in reference to pregnancy, from ectopia "morbid displacement of parts" (1847), coined in Modern Latin from Greek ektopos "away from a place, distant; foreign, strange," from ek- "out" (see ex-) + topos "place" (see topos).

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amenorrhea (n.)

"suppression of menstruation, especially from a cause other than age or pregnancy," 1804, Modern Latin, from Greek privative prefix a- "not" (see a- (3)) + men "month" (see moon (n.)) + rhein "to flow" (from PIE root *sreu- "to flow"). Related: amenorrheal.

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quicken (v.)

c. 1300, quikenen, "come to life, receive life," also transitive, "give life to," also "return to life from the dead;" see quick (adj.) + -en (1). The earlier verb was simply quick (c. 1200, from late Old English gecwician, and compare Old Norse kvikna).

The sense of "hasten, accelerate, impart speed to" is from 1620s. The intransitive meaning "become faster or more active" is by 1805. Also, of a woman, "enter that state of pregnancy in which the child gives indications of life;" of a child, "begin to manifest signs of life in the womb" (usually about the 18th week of pregnancy); probably originally in reference to the child but reversed and also used of the mother. Related: Quickened; quickening.

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