Etymology
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borscht (n.)
"Russian soup made with beets and cabbage," 1884, from Russian borshch "cow parsnip," which was an original recipe ingredient. Borscht belt "region of predominantly Jewish resorts in and around the Catskill Mountains of New York" (also known as the Yiddish Alps) is by 1938.
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reclusive (adj.)

1590s, of things, places, etc., "affording retirement from society," from recluse (q.v.) + -ive. By 20c. it was used predominantly of persons, "tending to live a retired life and mix little in society." Related: Reclusively; reclusiveness. Recluse alone formerly served also as an adjective in English (early 13c.).

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predominant (adj.)

1570s, "ruling; controlling; exerting power, authority, or influence," from French prédominant (14c.), from Medieval Latin *praedominantem (nominative praedominans), present participle of *praedominare, from Latin prae "before" (see pre-) + dominari "to rule, dominate, to govern," from dominus "lord, master," from domus "house" (from PIE root *dem- "house, household"). Weakened sense of "more frequent, prevalent" is from c. 1600. Related: Predominantly.

Predominant implies activity, and actual or figurative effort after leadership on the part of that which is predominated over: as, a predominant faction; a predominant opinion is one that seems to put down all others. [Century Dictionary]
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