Etymology
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predator (n.)

"animal that preys upon another," 1862, from Latin praedator "plunderer," from praedari "to rob" (see predation). Latin Predatores (Swainson, 1840) was used in biology of the group of coleopterous insects that ate other insects.

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predate (v.)

"to seek prey," 1974, a back-formation from predator, predation, etc. Related: Predated; predating. For the word that means "antedate; pre-exist," see pre-date.

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rover (n.1)

"sea-robber, pirate," late 14c. (c. 1300 as a surname), from Middle Dutch rover "robber, predator, plunderer," especially in zeerovere "pirate," literally "sea-robber," from roven "to rob," from Middle Dutch roof "spoil, plunder," related to Old English reaf "spoil, plunder," reafian "to reave" (see reave (v.), and compare reaver).

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predatory (adj.)

1580s, "involving plundering or pillaging," from Latin praedatorius "pertaining to plunder," from praedator "plunderer," from praedor "to plunder," from praeda "prey" (see prey (n.)). In zoology, "habitually preying upon other animals," from 1660s.

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