Etymology
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possibility (n.)

late 14c., "state, fact, or condition of being possible," from Old French possibilité (13c.) and directly from Latin possibilitatem (nominative possibilitas) "possibility," from possibilis (see possible (adj.)). Meaning "a possible thing or substance; that which may take place or come into being" is from c. 1400. Related: Possibilities.

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potentially (adv.)

mid-15c., potencialli, "in possibility, in an undeveloped or unrealized manner or state" (opposed to actually); from potential + -ly (2).

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justifiability (n.)

"quality of being justifiable; possibility of being defended or excused," 1835, from justifiable + -ity. Justifiableness is from 1630s.

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solvitur ambulando 
an appeal to practical experience for a solution or proof, Latin, literally "(the problem) is solved by walking," originally in reference to the proof by Diogenes the Cynic of the possibility of motion.
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Zenonian (adj.)
1843, pertaining to one of two Greek thinkers: Zeno of Elea ("Zeno of the Paradoxes," 5c. B.C.E.), who disproved the possibility of motion; and Zeno of Citium (c. 300 B.C.E.), founder of stoicism.
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contingence (n.)

late 14c., "the assumption or possibility that that which happens is dependent upon circumstances or chance," from Medieval Latin contingentia, from contingent- present participle stem of contingere "to touch" (see contact (n.)).

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contingency (n.)
Origin and meaning of contingency

1560s, "quality of being contingent, openness to chance or free will, the possibility that that which happens might not have happened," from contingent + abstract noun suffix -cy. Meaning "a chance occurrence, an accident, an event which may or may not occur" is from 1610s.

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postmodernism (n.)
also post-modernism, by 1977, from post- + modernism. Defined by Terry Eagleton as "the contemporary movement of thought which rejects ... the possibility of objective knowledge" and is therefore "skeptical of truth, unity, and progress" ["After Theory," 2003]. Related: post-modernist (1965).
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escape (n.)
c. 1400, "an act of escaping, action of escaping," also "a possibility of escape," from escape (v.) or from Old French eschap; earlier eschap (c. 1300). Mental/emotional sense is from 1853. From 1810 as "a means of escape." The contractual escape clause recorded by 1939.
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Rhodes 

Greek island, largest of the Dodecanese, from Greek Rhodos, which is perhaps from rhodon "rose," which Beekes allows as a possibility, or rhoia "pomegranate," but "more likely" [Room] from a pre-Greek name, from Phoenician erod "snake," for the serpents which were said to have anciently infested the island. Related: Rhodian.

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