Etymology
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porridge (n.)

1530s, porage "thickened soup of vegetables boiled in water, with or without meat," an alteration of pottage, perhaps from influence of Middle English porray, porreie "leek broth," which is from Old French poree "leek soup," from Vulgar Latin *porrata, from Latin porrum "leek." Or perhaps the modern word is a corruption of porray itself, by influence of pottage.

 The spelling with -idge is attested from c. 1600. The meaning "food made by slowly stirring meal or flour of oats, peas, etc. into water or milk while boiling till a thick mass is formed" is from 1640s, first in Scottish.

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puree (n.)

kind of broth or soup made from vegetables, etc., boiled to a pulp and passed through a sieve, 1707, from French purée, a word of disputed and uncertain origin. Compare porridge.

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porringer (n.)

"a porridge-dish; a small vessel deeper than a plate, usually with upright sides, a nearly flat bottom, and one or two ears," late 15c., alteration of potynger, potager "small dish for stew," from Middle English potage (see pottage) by the same course of changes that produced porridge; and with unetymological -n- by 1530s (compare passenger).

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pease 

"peas collectively," Old English; see pea, of which this is the original form. Pease-porridge "a porridge made of pease meal" is from 1530s.

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pot-stick (n.)

also potstick, "stick for stirring porridge, etc.," early 15c., from pot (n.1) + stick (n.).

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pulse (n.2)

"peas, beans, lentils; the esculent seeds of any leguminous plant," late 13c., puls, from Old French pouls, pous, pols and directly from Latin puls "thick gruel, porridge, mush," which is suspected of being (perhaps via Etruscan), from Greek poltos "porridge" made from flour, or both the Greek and Latin words might be from the same source (compare pollen), which might be a loanword from a non-PIE Mediterranean language or an as-yet-unknown PIE root.

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atheroma (n.)
"encysted tumor," 1706, medical Latin, from Greek atheroma, from athere "groats, porridge" (related to ather "chaff"), in reference to the matter inside; a word of unknown origin. For ending, see -oma. Related: Athermatous (1670s).
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gooey (adj.)
1893, American English slang, from goo + -y (2). The first element perhaps somehow imitative, or shortened from burgoo (1787) "thick porridge."
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grout (n.)
"thin, fluid mortar" used in joints of masonry and brickwork, 1580s, extended from sense "coarse porridge," perhaps from Old English gruta (plural) "coarse meal," from Proto-Germanic *grut-, from PIE root *ghreu- "to rub, grind" (see grit (n.)). As a verb from 1838. Related: grouted; grouting.
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mush (n.)

"kind of porridge; meal boiled in water or milk until it forms a thick, soft mass," 1670s, in the American colonies, a variant of mash (n.) "soft mixture." Meaning "anything soft and thick" is attested from 1824.

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