Etymology
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poo (n.)
also pooh, baby-talk for "excrement," 1950s (see poop (n.2)).
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poodle (n.)

dog breed, 1808, from German Pudel, shortened form of Pudelhund "water dog," from Low German Pudel "puddle" (compare pudeln "to splash;" see puddle (n.)) + German Hund "hound" (see hound (n.)). Probably so called because the dog originally was used to hunt water fowl, but in England and America it was from the start mainly an undersized fancy or toy dog with long, curly hair. Figurative sense of "lackey" (chiefly British) is attested from 1907. Poodle-faker, British army slang for "ingratiating male," is from 1902, likely euphemistic.

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poop (n.2)

"excrement," 1744, a children's euphemism, probably of imitative origin. The verb in this sense is from 1903, but the same word in the sense "to break wind softly" is attested from 1721; earlier "to make a short blast on a horn" (poupen, late 14c.). Meaning "stupid or dull person" is from 1915, but this is perhaps short for nincompoop. Pooper-scooper is attested from 1970.

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poop (v.)

"become tired," 1931, of unknown origin (see pooped). With out (adv.) by 1934. Related: Pooping.

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car-pool (n.)
also carpool, "the sharing of a car ride by more than one person going to the same destination," 1942, American English, from car + pool (n.2). As a verb from 1962. Related: Carpooled; carpooling.
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poorhouse (n.)

"establishment in which persons receiving public charity are lodged and cared for," 1781, from poor (n.) + house (n.). Poor-farm "farm maintained at public expense for the housing and support of paupers" is by 1834, American English.

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poor (n.)

"poor persons collectively," mid-12c., from poor (adj.). The Latin adjective pauper "poor" also was used in a noun sense "a poor man." Middle English used poorlet (late 14c.) "poor man, wretched person" to translate Latin paupercula in the Bible.

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pooped (adj.)

"tired," 1931, of unknown origin, perhaps imitative of the sound of heavy breathing from exhaustion (compare poop (n.2)). But poop, poop out were used in 1920s in aviation, of an engine, "to die." Also there is a verb poop, of ships, "to be overwhelmed by a wave from behind," often with catastrophic consequences (see poop (n.1)); hence in figurative nautical use, "to be overcome and defeated" (attested in 1920s).

It is an easy thing to "run"; the difficulty is to know when to stop. There is always the possibility of being "pooped," which simply means being overtaken by a mountain of water and crushed into the depths out of harm's way for good and all. [Ralph Stock, "The Cruise of the Dream Ship," 1921]
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pool-ball (n.)

"ivory ball used in the game of pool," by 1871, from pool (n.2) + ball (n.1).

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poor-box (n.)

"box for receiving contributions of money for the poor," generally at the entrance of a church, 1620s, from poor (n.) + box (n.1).

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